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Augmented Reality – ..
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Category: Augmented Reality

Augmented Reality, Design, people, Persuasive Technologies, Theory, Videos

Uncovering the Grammar of VR

November 2, 2015

Saschka Unseld  Creative Director, Oculus Story Studio

In virtual reality, you are at the center of every story. Saschka Unseld, head of Oculus Story Studio, wants to keep you there, experiencing virtual worlds directly, with characters who interact with you in real time. You read a book and you watch a film, but in virtual reality, you experience a story. It’s told through your senses, and Unseld and his team are now discovering what that means—how characters should react to you, how to make your experience interactive and responsive. It’s a learning curve that’s just beginning—built on a heritage of storytelling but breaking down the fourth wall in a new way. Unseld shared some of what his studio is learning at this year’s Future of Storytelling Conference.

The studio has already released two short form experiences, Lost and Henry. The latter was intended to be a comedy, but as Unseld explained, it was difficult to keep if from being a tragedy:

With Henry, for example what we did, we thought, “Okay, let’s try to tell a comedy — typical slapstick kind of animated character comedy.”

The final film turned out to be more sad than funny. If you would cut it as a film, exactly the same thing, you would have a lot of laughs. But in VR, you don’t. If someone falls on their face right next to you, it’s not funny.

In cinema. you have something like the fourth wall, which means there is this wall between the story and the world and the audience. In VR, there is no such thing as a fourth wall, because in VR you are right there with the characters in the world.

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, HCI, playstudies, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

Magic Leap

October 26, 2015

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Magic Leap, Inc., a developer of novel human computing interfaces and software, announced in a newsletter the recent closing of its A round of venture capital. Magic Leap has now raised more than $50 million in its series seed and A rounds to develop its proprietary technology platform. Magic Leap will use the funds to advance the product development and commercialization of its proprietary human computing interface technology, known as “Cinematic RealityTM”.

At engagdet – Mariella Moon states that she can’t decipher what Magic Leap exactly is – but she argues that Magic Leap is:

a headset that superimposes digital images onto the real world. In that respect, it’s similar to Microsoft’s HoloLens, which is just slightly less mysterious (since we’ve actually seen it). But based on the things Abovitz said in his AMA at reddit, like “Our vision for AR and VR is a true replication of visual reality,” there’s a chance that it can also block the outside world entirely with virtual reality. (Update: Rachel Metz confirmed to engagdet on Twitter that it’s capable of doing full VR.)


This points out  that there’s a reason why the company is calling its technology “cinematic reality” rather than AR or VR: it works a bit differently than either of them. Standard AR and VR use stereoscopic 3D, a technique that tricks you into thinking an object is three-dimensional by showing each eye a different image and a different angle of the same object. The Oculus Rift and Samsung’s Gear VR headset are two well-known examples of this technique.

magic-leap

In his AMA Abovitz revealed that he’s not a fan of stereoscopic 3D and believes it can cause “temporary and/or permanent neurologic deficits.” So, Magic Leap uses a Lilliputian projector to shine light and images into the user’s eyes instead, the startup told Metz from MIT’s Technology Review. Your brain apparently won’t be able to detect the difference between light from the projector and light from the real world: The result is life-like digital images that show reflections like real physical objects would.

Sources:

Magic Leap

reddit

engagdet

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, playstudies, Tools

HoloLens

July 22, 2015

4 hololens

Microsoft HoloLens puts you at the center of a world that blends holograms with reality. With the ability to design and shape holograms, you’ll have a new medium to express your creativity, a more efficient way to teach and learn, and a more effective way to visualize your work and share ideas. Your digital content and creations will be more relevant when they come to life in the world around you.


Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Augmented Reality: Theory and Practice

May 4, 2015

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by Dieter Schmalstieg (Author), Tobias Hollerer (Author)

Augmented Reality (AR) is one of today’s most fascinating and future-oriented areas of computer science and technology. By overlaying computer-generated information on views of the real world, AR amplifies human perception and cognition in remarkable new ways. Do you like the virtual first-down line in football games on TV? That’s AR — and AR apps are rapidly coming to billions of smartphones, too. Working in AR requires knowledge from diverse disciplines, including computer vision, computer graphics, and human-computer interaction (HCI).

 

Augmented Reality: Principles and Practice integrates all this knowledge into one single-source reference, presenting the most significant AR work with scrupulous accuracy. Dieter Schmalstieg, a pioneer of both AR foundation and application, is drawing from his two decades of AR experience to clearly present the field. Together with mobile AR pioneer and research colleague Tobias Höllerer he addresses all aspects of the field, illuminating AR from both technical and HCI perspectives. The authors review AR’s technical foundations, including display and tracking technologies, show how AR emerges from the symbiosis of computer vision and computer graphics, introduce AR-specific visualization and 3D interaction techniques, and showcase applications from diverse industries. They conclude with an outlook on trends and emerging technologies, including practical pointers for beginning practitioners.

 

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

Wearing Embodied Emotions: A Practice Based Design Research on Wearable Technology

April 29, 2014

Screen shot 2015-03-04 at 21.13.25

by Secil Ugur (Author)

Today, people are in an era of digitally mediated Human-to-Human Interaction, which cannot provide full sensorial contact and therefore, emotions cannot be communicated completely. The intimate cover of the human body, i.e. garment is the interface, where many personal traits are embodied. With the improvements in textile and electronics industry, this embodiment can be carried on a higher level, where the garments become dynamic interfaces and extensions of the human body. This book consists of a research on skin, clothes and technology as extensions of human body, emotions, technology-mediated emotions and a design practice that explores the communicative level of wearable technology through turning it into a living surface, which can convert intangible data to tangible in order to provide an emotional communication. This book aims to show how Human-Technology interaction is carried into an alternative context, where technology dissolves in use and starts serving for enhancing HHI.
Augmented Reality, Conferences, Design, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

The Leviathan Project

January 10, 2014

On January 6th 2012, at the Intel Pre-Conference Keynote at CES in Las Vegas – for the first time in public – Intel and USC World Building Media Lab unveiled the Leviathan – a giant Whale that swims above an audience of 5000, all reaching out to touch the creature flying overhead.

From the presentation:

We bring you an experiment in storytelling that shatters the membrane between audience and content. The Leviathan Project creates an immersive world in which audiences can engage, explore and physically experience virtual environments and fantastic characters.

We are playtesting a future where the design of a world precedes the telling of a story, and the richly detailed world becomes a container for countless narratives.

What Is 5D?

5D Institute is a cutting edge USC non-profit Organized Research Unit dedicated to the dissemination, education, and appreciation of the future of narrative media through World Building.

World Building designates a narrative practice in which the design of a world precedes the telling of a story; the richly detailed world becomes a container for narrative, producing stories that emerge logically and organically from its well-designed core.

World Building is founded on three beliefs, namely that storytelling is the most powerful system for the advancement of human capability due to its ability to allow the human imagination to precede the realization of thought; that all stories emerge logically and intuitively from the worlds that create them; and that new technologies powerfully enable us to sculpt the imagination into existence.

5D Institute is the world’s leading World Building collective. Our network of preeminent World Builders transcends borders and boundaries in film, animation, fashion, gaming, theatre, television, music, architecture, science, interactive media and more.

Through the newly cemented partnership with USC School of Cinematic Arts, 5D Institute is evolving into an unmatched connector between the next generation of young and undiscovered creators traversing the bleeding edge of innovation and companies who want to be at the frontlines of the new media landscape.

Since Oct 2008, we have come together at 5D’s distributed events to engage in a disruptive interrogation of our fractured disciplines, to create best practices and a new shared language across narrative media.

‘The neural sparking between left brain and right brain is at the core of 5D – we are moving into a landscape where art and science, design and engineering are inseparable. At their intersection lies the new creative laboratory for the future of our narrative practices.’

– Alex McDowell, 5D Institute Director

For more information:  5dinstitute.org/

Augmented Reality, Books

Prototyping Augmented Reality

January 9, 2014

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by Tony Mullen  (Author)
Learn to create augmented reality apps using Processing open–source programming language Augmented reality (AR) is used all over, and you may not even realize it. Smartphones overlay data onto live camera views to show homes for sale, restaurants, or historical sites. American football broadcasts use AR to show the invisible first–down line on the field to TV viewers. Nike and Budweiser, among others, have used AR in ads. Now, you can learn to create AR prototypes using 3D data, Processing open–source programming language, and other languages. This unique book is an easy–to–follow guide on how to do it. Guides you through the emerging technology of Augmented Reality (AR) Shows you how to use 3D data with the Processing programming environment and other languages to create AR prototypes for the web, smartphones, Macs, and PCs Helps 3D artists and designers who want to move into the AR market but don′t have programming skills Covers the essentials of 3D programming, creating objects for an AR library, building and exporting 3D models, and much more Explains how to interactively link 3D to physical, virtual, and streaming environments Author Tony Mullen is both an artist and a programmer and perfectly suited to explain how to bridge these two worlds, as he so deftly does in Prototyping with Augmented Reality .
Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Understanding Augmented Reality: Concepts and Applications

November 8, 2013

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by Alan B. Craig  (Author)

Augmented reality is one of the newest innovations in the electronics industry. It is the superimposing of graphics, audio and other sense enhancements onto real-time environments – combining the physical and virtual worlds. Recent examples include the following: on TV, you have the super-imposed first down line in football games; on cell phones, apps now use the phone’s camera and GPS capabilities to gather info about one’s surrounding area, overlaying this information on the phone’s screen. The essential components of Augmented Reality are simple: A computer (cell phone or laptop), a camera, sensors (GPS, touch, accelerometer, compass) and finally tracking software. But there are so many ways to develop AR technologies. Some applications are dependent on computer vision algorithms; others use other devices such as GPS, gyroscopes, accelerometers and other sensors. Likewise, numerous software libraries are emerging that offer different approaches to AR technologies. It is confusing, at best, trying to determine the best approach to take, and the most appropriate system architecture and software to use when developing your own AR applications. Enter this book – a technical overview to the entire medium that provides the necessary background of what AR really is, the lay of the land in terms of hardware, software, interaction techniques, content development, and usability concerns to prepare you to create compelling and appropriate AR applications. You can explore the different techniques and approaches used in developing AR applications. This book helps untangle the seemingly endless different approaches that are being taken in the market today. You can learn from the author’s deep experience in virtual reality and augmented reality applications to succeed right off the bat, and avoid many of the traps that catch new developers. Associated website includes: sample projects and additional code, cool application examples available for download, links to interesting applications that support the points being made in the book.
Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

The Art of Immersion

September 4, 2013

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The Art of Immersion – a highly praised book – author Frank Rose explains his understanding of storytelling, and what it means for us all:

Some quotes from the webpage:

 What we’re witnessing is the emergence of a new form of narrative that’s native to the In­ternet. Told through many media at once in a nonlinear fashion, these new narratives en­cour­age us not merely to watch but to par­ticipate, often engaging us in the same way that games do. This is “deep media”: stories that are not just entertaining but immersive, that take you deep­er than an hour-long TV drama or a two-hour movie or a 30-second spot will permit.

From this point forward, storytellers of every persuasion will need to function in a world in which distinctions that were clear throughout the industrial age are be­coming in­creasingly blurred:

  • The blurring of author and audience: Whose story is it?
  • The blurring of story and game: How do you engage with it?
  • The blurring of entertainment and marketing: What function does it serve?
  • The blurring of fiction and reality: Where does one end and the other begin?

In THE ART OF IMMERSIONWired correspondent Frank Rose describes why this is happening to us.

“Highly readable, deeply engaging . . . accessible and urgent.”

—Henry Jenkins, author of Convergence Culture

The Art of Immersion is a must read for all filmmakers.”

—Ted Hope, producer of 21 Grams and The Laramie Project

 

More reviews:


“The Web lets us dive deeper than ever before, though into what is up to us. A new avant-garde is taking the plunge – not underground, but online. For those of us lagging behind, wading rather than diving into art’s new cyber-sphere, Frank Rose makes an excellent guide.” The Atlantic

 

★ “Like Marshall McLuhan’s groundbreaking 1964 book, Understanding Media, this engrossing study of how new media is reshaping the entertainment, advertising, and communication industries is an essential read.” —Library Journal

 

“Fascinating . . . [Frank Rose] talks about how the Internet is changing the way we create and consume narrative. He notes that media innovations, such as radio or television, take a few decades before we learn how to best utilize them. TV started out as live broadcasts and ended up creating a new form of narrative. The Internet started out as a digital repository for print journalism, but is now creating a new form of engagement. ‘We are ceasing to be consumers of mass media,’ says Rose, ‘we are becoming participants in social media—a far more fluid environment in which we simultaneously act as producers, consumers, curators, and commentators, sharing our thoughts and perceptions with people we know and people we don’t.'”
—Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post

 

“The worldwide web has already begun to have an influence on imaginative ex­pres­sion. The Internet, as Frank Rose writes in The Art of Immersion, ‘is the first me­dium that can act like all media. It can be text, or audio, or video, or all of the above. . . .’ According to Rose, ‘a new type of narrative is emerging – one that’s told through many media at once in a way that’s nonlinear, that’s participatory and often game-like, and that’s designed above all to be immersive. This is deep media.'”
Robert McCrum, The Observer

 

“Compelling . . . The era of the couch potato, argues Rose, is at an end. . . . From Star Wars to Lost (‘television for the hive mind’), it is the immersive, ‘fractal-like com­plexity’ of storytelling that turns on digital audiences and sends them online to extend the fantasy via wikis, Twitter and blogs.” —P.D. Smith, The Guardian

 

“It’s a grand trip, taking in everything from Charles Dickens to Super Mario and Avatar. The book is meticulously researched, persuasively constructed and benefits from an impressive level of access.” New Scientist

 

 

“Tremendously lively and clever . . . An intelligent guide to how technologies have created new opportunities for narrative.” —Scotland on Sunday

 

“Clear, concise and scrupulously fact-checked . . . For anyone even remotely in­terested in a how-we-got-here-and-where-we’re-going guide to interactive, socially-networked entertainment, it’s an essential read.” —David Hughes, Empire

 

“As the American Frank Rose argues in his book The Art of Immersion, TV pro­grammes such as the internationally successful drama Lost have spread out from their original shape, partly . . . because scriptwriters have become influenced by games culture.” —BBC World Service

 

“An exciting book which shows how the Internet is changing the world of entertainment. . . . Frank Rose describes an ongoing artistic revolution that breaks with traditional, linear narrative and gives us a new understanding of reality.”
TF1 News

 

“An inquiry into the heart of the culture industry. . . . [The Art of Immersion] reflects on the unstable borders of fiction—before and after the digital revolution—and even on the definition of a work of art.” —Les Inrockuptibles

 


“With this book, Rose seeks to convey the message that we are only at the beginning of a radical anthropological shift. The revolution brought about by the Internet is altering reality, and this transformed world is inventing its own language and its own codes to portray itself.” —Libération

 

“A new media bible.” la Repubblica

 

“Television has not disappeared, nor will it. But content production is changing pro­foundly. The networked computer has facilitated the rise of deep media, that is, me­dia which take into account the exhaustion of the unidirectional broadcast model of television, pointing directly to the involvement of the audience as generators of con­tent. It is to these deep media that the book is dedicated.”
Benedetto Vecchi, il Manifesto

 

“A comprehensive overview of the evolution of the way we create culture and enter­tainment.” —la Stampa

 

“Captivating . . . We’re in the midst of a fascinating – and delirious, often over­whelming – cultural moment, one that Rose, with his important new book, astutely helps us to understand.” —Holly Willis, KCET-TV Los Angeles

 

"

“An essential overview . . . Applications in the academic world are clear (it is already on the syllabi for classes at USC and Columbia), but it also constitutes a prerequisite for those wishing to enter Hollywood, and marketers or PR professionals wishing to engage an increasingly fragmented audience.”
International Journal of Advertising

 

“In his terrific new book, The Art of Immersion, [Frank Rose] captures the need for new thinking. . . . We need tools to tell new stories for new times, and our stories right now reflect our culture: they’re fragmented, dispersed, remixed and remade. They’re networked and participatory and nonlinear.” —Filmmaker