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Category: Design for Behavior

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, playstudies, Tools

HoloLens

July 22, 2015

4 hololens

Microsoft HoloLens puts you at the center of a world that blends holograms with reality. With the ability to design and shape holograms, you’ll have a new medium to express your creativity, a more efficient way to teach and learn, and a more effective way to visualize your work and share ideas. Your digital content and creations will be more relevant when they come to life in the world around you.


Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Augmented Reality: Theory and Practice

May 4, 2015

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by Dieter Schmalstieg (Author), Tobias Hollerer (Author)

Augmented Reality (AR) is one of today’s most fascinating and future-oriented areas of computer science and technology. By overlaying computer-generated information on views of the real world, AR amplifies human perception and cognition in remarkable new ways. Do you like the virtual first-down line in football games on TV? That’s AR — and AR apps are rapidly coming to billions of smartphones, too. Working in AR requires knowledge from diverse disciplines, including computer vision, computer graphics, and human-computer interaction (HCI).

 

Augmented Reality: Principles and Practice integrates all this knowledge into one single-source reference, presenting the most significant AR work with scrupulous accuracy. Dieter Schmalstieg, a pioneer of both AR foundation and application, is drawing from his two decades of AR experience to clearly present the field. Together with mobile AR pioneer and research colleague Tobias Höllerer he addresses all aspects of the field, illuminating AR from both technical and HCI perspectives. The authors review AR’s technical foundations, including display and tracking technologies, show how AR emerges from the symbiosis of computer vision and computer graphics, introduce AR-specific visualization and 3D interaction techniques, and showcase applications from diverse industries. They conclude with an outlook on trends and emerging technologies, including practical pointers for beginning practitioners.

 

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory

Seductive Interaction Design

October 25, 2014

Unknown

What happens when you’ve built a great website or app, but no one seems to care? How do you get people to stick around long enough to see how your service might be of value? In Seductive Interaction Design, speaker and author Stephen P. Anderson takes a fresh approach to designing sites and interactions based on the stages of seduction. This beautifully designed book examines what motivates people to act.

Topics include:

  • AESTHETICS, BEAUTY, AND BEHAVIOR: Why do striking visuals grab our attention? And how do emotions affect judgment and behavior?
  • PLAYFUL SEDUCTION: How do you create playful engagements during the moment? Why are serendipity, arousal, rewards, and other delights critical to a good experience?
  • THE SUBTLE ART OF SEDUCTION: How do you put people at ease through clear and suggestive language? What are some subtle ways to influence behavior and get people to move from intent to action?
  • THE GAME OF SEDUCTION: How do you continue motivating people long after the first encounter? Are there lessons to be gained from learning theories or game design?

Principles from psychology are found throughout the book, along with dozens of examples showing how these techniques have been applied with great success. In addition, each section includes interviews with influential web and interaction designers.

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Garments of Paradise: Wearable Discourse in the Digital Age

July 20, 2014

 

 


Screen shot 2015-03-04 at 21.16.54

 

by Susan Elizabeth Ryan

Wearable technology — whether a Walkman in the 1970s, an LED-illuminated gown in the 2000s, or Google Glass today — makes the wearer visible in a technologically literate environment. Twenty years ago, wearable technology reflected cultural preoccupations with cyborgs and augmented reality; today, it reflects our newer needs for mobility and connectedness. In this book, Susan Elizabeth Ryan examines wearable technology as an evolving set of ideas and their contexts, always with an eye on actual wearables — on clothing, dress, and the histories and social relations they represent. She proposes that wearable technologies comprise a pragmatics of enhanced communication in a social landscape. “Garments of paradise” is a reference to wearable technology’s promise of physical and mental enhancements. Ryan defines “dress acts” — hybrid acts of communication in which the behavior of wearing is bound up with the materiality of garments and devices — and focuses on the use of digital technology as part of such systems of meaning. She connects the ideas of dress and technology historically, in terms of major discourses of art and culture, and in terms of mass media and media culture, citing such thinkers as Giorgio Agamben, Manuel De Landa, and Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. She examines the early history of wearable technology as it emerged in research labs; the impact of ubiquitous and affective approaches to computing; interaction design and the idea of wearable technology as a language of embodied technology; and the influence of open source ideology. Finally, she considers the future, as wearing technologies becomes an increasingly naturalized aspect of our social behavior.
Buy the book
Ambient Intelligence, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Augmented Reality: Engagement Beyond Usability

July 18, 2014

Augmented reality describes the process of using technology to overlay virtual information onto the real world to ‘augment,’ or add value, to our experience. Augmented reality applications are unique in that because they project virtual information into a user’s physical environment, they effectively blend real and virtual. They are also increasingly mobile and social. These features amplify the level of impact and persuasive power of the user experience — when done right.

All kinds of things go into success. And you might argue that usability is the key. But at the highest level, success depends on more than usability; it depends upon user experience. User experience is more than all those things combined. Of course, you still need to follow best practices for good usability because if people can’t do something they can’t be persuaded by it. But usability is no longer a key differentiator. It’s not enough.

Pamela Rutledge, Media Psychologist, Social Media and Transmedia Storytelling Strategist at the Media Psychology Research Center, gave the following presentation on these topics recently at WorldComp12 EEE.

Presentation overview:
1. Defining engagement
2. The need for a holistic evaluation of user and customer experience to achieve engagement.
3.  The role of the of the brain in achieving psychological engagement and outline the 3-brain model that you can use as a rule of thumb in your design and marketing decisions
4. Mapping brain behavior on to two theories of optimal engagement: Flow and Narrative Transportation.   Flow is optimal engagement for task-based activities.  Using story or narrative is an equally powerful way to achieve optimal engagement in narrative-based products and properties where the goal is experiential rather than task-based.
7. The similarities and differences between Flow and Narrative immersion as goals are critical to designing, developing and evaluating mobile and immersive technologies like AR.
8. Introduces the Positive Engagement Evaluation model

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, playstudies, Theory

Design For Kids

July 16, 2014

design for kids

Emotion. Ego. Impatience. Stubbornness. Characteristics like these make creating sites and apps for kids a daunting proposition. However, with a bit of knowledge, you can design experiences that help children think, play, and learn. With Design for Kids, you’ll learn how to create digital products for today’s connected generation.

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Virtual World Design

July 15, 2014

virtual-world-design

Written by an award-winning designer with 20 years of experience designing virtual environments for television and online communities, Virtual World Design explores the intertwining disciplines of 2D graphics, 3D models, lighting, sound, and storytelling. It illustrates how these disciplines come together by design in the creation of an accessible virtual environment for teaching, research, and entertainment. The book gives anyone the tools and techniques to design virtual environments that support their message and are accessible by all.

With 200 illustrations and 12 step-by-step projects, the book delivers hours of creative challenges for people working in public virtual worlds or on private grids. Using the modular components available for download on the author’s website, readers learn by building such things as a virtual classroom, an “all-access” terrain, and a sound-based game.

This book can be the foundation for class work in distance learning, simulation, and other learning technologies that use virtual environments. It shows both novices and advanced users how 3D composition, color, lighting, and sound design are used in the creation of an immersive virtual environment.

Design for Behavior

Habit Design

July 10, 2014

HABITDESIGNLOGO

Habit Design™ is the largest national cooperative in the USA for sharing best practices in developing sustainable daily habits that last beyond 100 days. Their goal is to spawn local “habit labs” across the world; over 8,000 members have participated representing 500+ companies, universities, non-profits, and other organizations.

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/channels/habitdesign]

Habit Design™ synthesizes applied research across a wide range of habit designers including entrepreneurs, Wellness companies & professionals, non-profits, trainers, coaches, academics, and everyday enthusiasts. Some methods, tools, & frameworks we’ve covered include Behavior-Change Psychology, Captology (Persuasive Technology), Game Mechanics & Techniques, Behavioral Economics, Sociology, etc.

Colleagues that have shared their research with Habit Design™ include Dr. BJ Fogg (Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab), Leo Babauta (Zenhabits.net), New York Times reporter Charles Duhigg (author of “The Power of Habit”), Dr. David Sobel (Kaiser Permanente), Dr. Kelly McGonigal, et.al. By integrating these crowdsourced best-practices, Habit Design™ tries to advance innovation in the community.

Habit Design was founded by Michael Kim – CEO/Founder of Kairos Labs – in San Francisco – who coined “behavior change gaming” – “games that apply behavior change and cognitive behavioral psychology in order to affect self-development”.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvT8MEdMdl4]

In this talk, given at the Next in Health Innoventions – Models for Change Conference 2011 in Seattle, Mike Kim identified “4 key mechanics” for changing behavior:

1. The Fogg behavior model– a framework for behavior change developed

by Stanford researcher BJ Fogg (whose work focuses on how technology can persuade behavior and decision-making of people.

The behavior model categorizes behavior into 15 types (one-shot, perpetual, foreign, familiar, start, stop, etc.) and is based on the simple formula of B = M*A*T [translated as behavior is contingent upon motivation, ability, and a trigger for that behavior to occur].  When a behavior does not occur, at least one of those three elements is missing.

Using Fogg’s Behavior Model (FBM) as a guide, designers can identify what stops people from performing behaviors that designers seek. For example, if users are not performing a target behavior, such as rating hotels on a travel web site, the FBM helps designers see what psychological element is lacking.

Behaviour1

According to the Fogg Model, it is easier to first focus a behavior change design not on an individual’s motivation for an activity, but rather, by simply just making it easier to perform the target behavior.

Behaviour2

The FBM highlights three principal elements, each of which has subcomponents. Specifically, the FBM outlines three Core Motivators (Motivation), six Simplicity Factors (Ability), and three type of Triggers. The subcomponents define the larger elements. For example, in the FBM the word Ability refers to the how the six Simplicity Factors work together in the context of a Trigger.

Many other people have proposed ways to understand persuasion and behavior change, dating back to Aristotle in ancient Greece. What makes the Fogg Behavior Model different from previous work? According to Fogg, the FBM shows how behavior is the result of three specific elements coming together at one moment. Next, the FBM explains the subcomponents of each element. In addition, the FBM shows that motivation and ability can be traded off (e.g., if motivation is very high, ability an be low). Finally, the FBM applies most directly to practical issues of designing for behavior change using today’s technology.

Mike Kim noted some examples of designs in line with this model, including donothingfor2minutes.com (which requires a user to focus on a serene vista for 2 minutes, with the timer resetting if the keyboard or mouse is touched) and Daily Challenge (which triggers users by sending you a daily email at 7am containing directions for a small behavior you can do to improve your health and wellbeing).

2. Timely “A-ha” Feedback Loops – Kim noted that there is currently a lot of buzz about using mobile techs delivering “just-in-time” feedback about user states or behavior.

Thus, Kim was quick to make clear that for this to produce effective behavior change, it needs to include more than just data-tracking and quantified results; it needs to actually provide a context for motivating the user toward a particular behavior.

Some interesting examples Kim shared with the audience included Massive Health’s eatery app (in which user upload pictures of what they are eating, which are then rated as relatively good or bad to eat by the community of users, providing first direct and then later vicarious reinforcement even outside of the game), Nike Plus’ “Cheer Me On” feature (in which your run is posted to Facebook and your friends are invited to cheer you as you go, resulting in audible cheers in your headphones), and Zamzee (a pedometer integrated with a gamine portal for winning real and virtual rewards, with reward patterns adapting to individual user behavior patterns).

 

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

From Self-Tracking to Smart Urban Infrastructures

July 4, 2014

 

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From self-tracking to smart urban infrastructures: Towards an interdisciplinary research agenda on Big Data

– interesting article by Francisco R. Klauser and Anders Albrechtslund

 

Abstract

Recent debates on surveillance have emphasised the now myriad possibilities of automated, software-based data gathering, management and analysis. One of the many terms used to describe this phenomenon is ‘Big Data’. The field of Big Data covers a large and complex range of practices and technologies from smart borders to CCTV video analysis, and from consumer profiling to self-tracking applications. The paper’s aim is to explore the surveillance dynamics inherent in contemporary Big Data trends. To this end, the paper adopts two main perspectives concerned with two complementary expressions of Big Data: (1) the individual use of various techniques of self-surveillance and tracking and (2) the simultaneous trend to optimise urban infrastructures through smart information technologies. Drawing upon exploratory research conducted by the authors, the paper shows that both expressions of Big Data present a range of common surveillance dynamics on at least four levels: agency, temporality, spatiality and normativity. On these grounds, the paper highlights a series of important issues to explore in future research.

Download pdf

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Evil by Design

June 25, 2014

evildesign

How to make customers feel good about doing what you want Learn how companies make us feel good about doing what they want. Approaching persuasive design from the dark side, this book melds psychology, marketing, and design concepts to show why we’re susceptible to certain persuasive techniques. Packed with examples from every nook and cranny of the web, it provides easily digestible and applicable patterns for putting these design techniques to work. Organized by the seven deadly sins, it includes:

Pride — use social proof to position your product in line with your visitors’ values

Sloth — build a path of least resistance that leads users where you want them to go

Gluttony — escalate customers’ commitment and use loss aversion to keep them there

Anger — understand the power of metaphysical arguments and anonymity

Envy — create a culture of status around your product and feed aspirational desires Lust — turn desire into commitment by using emotion to defeat rational behavior

Greed — keep customers engaged by reinforcing the behaviors you desire

Now you too can leverage human fallibility to create powerful persuasive interfaces that people will love to use — but will you use your new knowledge for good or evil? Learn more on the companion website, evilbydesign.info.

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Transmedia Storytelling

A Game Design Vocabulary

March 12, 2014

game vocabulary

Why aren’t videogames getting better? Why does it feel like we’re playing the same games, over and over again? Why aren’t games helping us transform our lives, like great music, books, and movies do?

The problem is language. We still don’t know how to talk about game design. We can’t share our visions. We forget what works (and doesn’t). We don’t learn from history. It’s too hard to improve.

The breakthrough starts here. A Game Design Vocabulary gives us the complete game design framework we desperately need—whether we create games, study them, review them, or build businesses on them.

Craft amazing experiences. Anna Anthropy and Naomi Clark share foundational principles, examples, and exercises that help you create great player experiences…complement intuition with design discipline…and craft games that succeed brilliantly on every level.

  • Liberate yourself from stale clichés and genres
  • Tell great stories: go way beyond cutscenes and text dumps
  • Control the crucial relationships between game “verbs” and “objects”
  • Wield the full power of development, conflict, climax, and resolution
  • Shape scenes, pacing, and player choices
  • Deepen context via art, animation, music, and sound
  • Help players discover, understand, engage, and “talk back” to you
  • Effectively use resistance and difficulty: the “push and pull” of games
  • Design holistically: integrate visuals, audio, and controls
  • Communicate a design vision everyone can understand
Design, Design for Behavior, HCI

Making Use: Scenario Based Design of Human Computer Interactions

February 18, 2014

making use

Difficult to learn and awkward to use, today’s information systems often change our activities in ways that we do not need or want. The problem lies in the software development process.

In this book John Carroll shows how a pervasive but underused element of design practice, the scenario, can transform information systems design.Traditional textbook approaches manage the complexity of the design process via abstraction, treating design problems as if they were composites of puzzles.

Scenario-based design uses concretization. A scenario is a concrete story about use. For example: “A person turned on a computer; the screen displayed a button labeled Start; the person used the mouse to select the button.” Scenarios are a vocabulary for coordinating the central tasks of system development–understanding people’s needs, envisioning new activities and technologies, designing effective systems and software, and drawing general lessons from systems as they are developed and used.

Instead of designing software by listing requirements, functions, and code modules, the designer focuses first on the activities that need to be supported and then allows descriptions of those activities to drive everything else.In addition to a comprehensive discussion of the principles of scenario-based design, the book includes in-depth examples of its application.

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Behavioral Economics: A History

February 17, 2014

behavioural economics

This book presents a history of behavioral economics. The recurring theme is that behavioral economics reflects and contributes to a fundamental reorientation of the epistemological foundations upon which economics had been based since the days of Smith, Ricardo, and Mill. With behavioral economics, the discipline has shifted from grounding its theories in generalized characterizations to building theories from behavioral assumptions directly amenable to empirical validation and refutation. The book proceeds chronologically and takes the reader from von Neumann and Morgenstern’s axioms of rational behavior, through the incorporation of rational decision theory in psychology in the 1950s-1970s, and to the creation and rise of behavioral economics in the 1980s and 1990s at the Sloan and Russell Sage Foundations.

Design for Behavior, HCI, people, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Nir Eyal: Stop Designing Apps And Start Designing Habits

February 12, 2014

 

Nir Eyal constructed a framework for designing habit-forming products. He states:

The “desire engine” gives product makers and designers a model for thinking of the necessary components to create user behavior. Habit design is a super power. If used for good, habit design can enhance people’s lives with entertaining and even healthful routines. If used for evil, habits can quickly turn into wasteful addictions.

The trinity of access, data, and speed creates new opportunities for habit-forming technologies to hook users and everything becomes more addictive. Companies need to know how to harness the power of the desire engine to improve peoples’ lives, while consumers need to understand the mechanics of behavior engineering to protect themselves from manipulation. More and more developers realize that their success hinges on understanding user behavior. Nir Eyal used patterns collected from his 4 years in the gaming and advertising business and one year of research as a consultant and lecturer at the Stanford GSB, to create a tool, which should greatly improve the odds of success for a startup.

For more info, see his blog at: nirandfar.com.

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, Media Art, Theory

Practice-led Research, Research-led Practice in the Creative Arts

January 4, 2014


Screen shot 2015-03-04 at 18.04.16

Practice-led Research, Research-led Practice in the Creative Arts (Research Methods for the Arts and Humanities)

Roger T. Dean (Author, Editor), Hazel Smith (Editor)
This book addresses one of the most exciting and innovative developments within higher education: the rise in prominence of the creative arts and the accelerating recognition that creative practice is a form of research. The book considers how creative practice can lead to research insights through what is often known as practice-led research. But unlike other books on practice-led research, it balances this with discussion of how research can impact positively on creative practice through research-led practice. The editors posit an iterative and web-like relationship between practice and research. Essays within the book cover a wide range of disciplines including creative writing, dance, music, theatre, film and new media, and the contributors are from the UK, US, Canada and Australia. The subject is approached from numerous angles: the authors discuss methodologies of practice-led research and research-led practice, their own creative work as a form of research, research training for creative practitioners, and the politics and histories of practice-led research and research-led practice within the university. The book will be invaluable for creative practitioners, researchers, students in the creative arts and university leaders. Key Features *The first book to document, conceptualise and analyse practice-led research in the creative arts and to balance it with research-led practice *Written by highly qualified academics and practitioners across the creative arts and sciences *Brings together empirical, cultural and creative approaches *Presents illuminating case histories of creative work and practice-led research.
Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Designing for Behavior Change: Applying Psychology and Behavioral Economics

November 27, 2013

behaviourchangebook

A new wave of products is helping people change their behavior and daily routines, whether it’s exercising more (Jawbone Up), taking control of their finances (HelloWallet), or organizing their email (Mailbox). This practical guide shows you how to design these types of products for users seeking to take action and achieve specific goals.

Stephen Wendel, HelloWallet’s head researcher, takes you step-by-step through the process of applying behavioral economics and psychology to the practical problems of product design and development. Using a combination of lean and agile development methods, you’ll learn a simple iterative approach for identifying target users and behaviors, building the product, and gauging its effectiveness. Discover how to create easy-to-use products to help people make positive changes.

  • Learn the three main strategies to help people change behavior.
  • Identify your target audience and the behaviors they seek to change.
  • Extract user stories and identify obstacles to behavior change.
  • Develop effective interface designs that are enjoyable to use.
  • Measure your product’s impact and learn ways to improve it.
  • Use practical examples from products like Nest, Fitbit, and Opower.
Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Computer Systems Experiences of Users with and Without Disabilities: An Evaluation Guide for Professionals

computersystems users

This book provides the necessary tools for the evaluation of the interaction between the user who is disabled and the computer system that was designed to assist that person. It creates an evaluation process able to assess the user’s satisfaction with a developed system. It takes into account all of the individuals involved in the evaluation process. It presents a new theoretical perspective in the human computer interaction evaluation of disabled persons.

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Understanding Augmented Reality: Concepts and Applications

November 8, 2013

41r4ic8KiyL-1._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

by Alan B. Craig  (Author)

Augmented reality is one of the newest innovations in the electronics industry. It is the superimposing of graphics, audio and other sense enhancements onto real-time environments – combining the physical and virtual worlds. Recent examples include the following: on TV, you have the super-imposed first down line in football games; on cell phones, apps now use the phone’s camera and GPS capabilities to gather info about one’s surrounding area, overlaying this information on the phone’s screen. The essential components of Augmented Reality are simple: A computer (cell phone or laptop), a camera, sensors (GPS, touch, accelerometer, compass) and finally tracking software. But there are so many ways to develop AR technologies. Some applications are dependent on computer vision algorithms; others use other devices such as GPS, gyroscopes, accelerometers and other sensors. Likewise, numerous software libraries are emerging that offer different approaches to AR technologies. It is confusing, at best, trying to determine the best approach to take, and the most appropriate system architecture and software to use when developing your own AR applications. Enter this book – a technical overview to the entire medium that provides the necessary background of what AR really is, the lay of the land in terms of hardware, software, interaction techniques, content development, and usability concerns to prepare you to create compelling and appropriate AR applications. You can explore the different techniques and approaches used in developing AR applications. This book helps untangle the seemingly endless different approaches that are being taken in the market today. You can learn from the author’s deep experience in virtual reality and augmented reality applications to succeed right off the bat, and avoid many of the traps that catch new developers. Associated website includes: sample projects and additional code, cool application examples available for download, links to interesting applications that support the points being made in the book.
Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

The Silent Intelligence: The Internet of Things

September 20, 2013

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The Silent Intelligence is a book about the Internet of Things. We talk about the history, trends, technology ecosystem and future of Connected Cities, Connected Homes, Connected Health and Connected Cars. We also discuss the most exciting growth areas for entrepreneurs and venture capital investors. We share exciting stories and unique opinions of more than 30 industry veterans, experts and visionaries from Google, Ericsson, AT&T, Qualcomm, SAP, MIT, Jawbone and many others. We called this book The Silent Intelligence because most of the activity and growth in the space so far has been outside of mainstream visibility. Our aim is to help executives, entrepreneurs, investors and everybody who is interested in this topic, better understand the opportunities and challenges of the Internet of Things. We also hope that the new growth opportunities discussed in this book will be as exciting to you as they are to us.
Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design for Behavior, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Age of Context: Mobile, Sensors, Data and the Future of Privacy

September 5, 2013

Unknown

In 2006, co-authors Robert Scoble and Shel Israel wrote Naked Conversations, a book that persuaded businesses to embrace what we now call social media. Six years later they have teamed up again to report that social media is but one of five converging forces that promise to change virtually every aspect of our lives. You know these other forces already: mobile, data, sensors and location-based technology. Combined with social media they form a new generation of personalized technology that knows us better than our closest friends. Armed with that knowledge our personal devices can anticipate what we’ll need next and serve us better than a butler or an executive assistant. The resulting convergent superforce is so powerful that it is ushering in a era the authors call the Age of Context. In this new era, our devices know when to wake us up early because it snowed last night; they contact the people we are supposed to meet with to warn them we’re running late. They even find content worth watching on television. They also promise to cure cancer and make it harder for terrorists to do their damage. Astoundingly, in the coming age you may only receive ads you want to see. Scoble and Israel have spent more than a year researching this book. They report what they have learned from interviewing more than a hundred pioneers of the new technology and by examining hundreds of contextual products. What does it all mean? How will it change society in the future? The authors are unabashed tech enthusiasts, but as they write, an elephant sits in the living room of our book and it is called privacy. We are entering a time when our technology serves us best because it watches us; collecting data on what we do, who we speak with, what we look at. There is no doubt about it: Big Data is watching you. The time to lament the loss of privacy is over. The authors argue that the time is right to demand options that enable people to reclaim some portions of that privacy.
Crowdsourcing, Design, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, Social Innovation, Tools

TrustCloud

August 17, 2013

 

TrustCloud is an online tool that aggregates peoples’ online social and transactional data, crunches it into a TrustScore and creates dynamic TrustCards that people can embed on their social networks. People use TrustCloud to establish their reputation on their social networks and peer-to-peer buying, selling, sharing and lending platforms.

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TrustCloud likens itself to a FICO score that measures creditworthiness:

“TrustCloud gives members in the Sharing Economy the tools for Trust and Accountability that enable better decision-making and improves every transaction. We measure your virtuous online behaviors and transactions to build a portable TrustScore you can easily use within the Sharing Economy.”

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Designing Games: A Guide to Engineering Experiences

August 14, 2013

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How do video games resonate with players to become worldwide hits? This practical book shows you how the right combination of story elements, psychology, and game theory can generate emotionally charged experiences that take players beyond mindless entertainment. Author and experienced game designer Tynan Sylvester takes you through everything from narrative to motivation, using down-to-earth advice and real-world examples. Great games affect people in ways that stories alone cannot, and there are lots of possibilities yet to discover.

This book is a light along that path. Learn how to make practical design decisions and weigh trade offs Establish a planning horizon and test your design through iteration Find low-cost, high-reward solutions for making your game accessible yet deep Understand methods for balancing levels, scheduling rewards, and designing rich multilayer interactions Provide motivation, and discover how to make the game just difficult enough

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing

October 25, 2012

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Brainfluence explains how to practically apply neuroscience and behavior research to better market to consumers by understanding their decision patterns. This application, called neuromarketing, studies the way the brain responds to various cognitive and sensory marketing stimuli. Analysts use this to measure a consumer’s preference, what a customer reacts to, and why consumers make certain decisions. Roger Dooley is the creator and publisher of Neuromarketing, the most popular blog on using brain and behavior research in marketing, advertising, and sales.

Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies

The Why Axis: Hidden Motives and the Undiscovered Economics of Everyday Life

October 18, 2012

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Based on groundbreaking original research, The Why Axis is a colorful examination of why people do what they do—observed through the lens of incentives that can spur people to achieve.

Uri Gneezy and John List are like the anthropologists who spend months in the field studying the people in their native habitats. But in their case they embed themselves in our messy world to try and solve big, difficult problems, such as the gap between rich and poor students and the violence plaguing inner city schools; the real reasons people discriminate; whether women are really less competitive than men; and how to correctly price products and services.

Their field experiments in the factories, communities, and shops where real people live, work, and play show how economic incentives can change outcomes. Their results will change the way we both think about and take action on big and little problems, and force us to rely no longer on assumptions, but upon the evidence of what really works.

Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Tools

Augmented, Sensing and Mobile

July 15, 2012

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Putting things first lists some of the new products that allow people to augment their sensing (and sense-making) through external sensors, with result summaries visualised on smartphones and the web:

Health and healthy living: AsthmaSense, DigiFit, FitBit, Up
Sleep: Lark Sensor (WSJ article), WakeMate, Zeo
Sports: Nike+ (running), Strava (cycling), Wahoo
Home energy: Nest Learning Thermostat
Plants (!): Koubachi

Via putting things first

Books, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Mental Models: Aligning Design Strategy with Human Behavior

October 27, 2011

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There is no single methodology for creating the perfect product—but you can increase your odds. One of the best ways is to understand users’ reasons for doing things. Mental Models gives you the tools to help you grasp, and design for, those reasons. Adaptive Path co-founder Indi Young has written a roll-up-your-sleeves book for designers, managers, and anyone else interested in making design strategic, and successful.

Review

There’s a passion for mental models in this book which is contagious, even to an existing supporter of the concept. –Joanna Bawa, Usability News

I think it is a must read for design teams. When using Indi Young’s mental models in your process you will without a doubt improve the quality of your products for the target audience. –Jeroen van Geel, Johnny Holland

Those in the social sciences will revel in its qualitative and intuitive approach, yet those in the hard science will appreciate its straightforward and simplistic tone. –Marisa Peacock, CMSWire

About the Author

Indi’s work spans a number of decades, from the mid-80’s when the desktop metaphor was replacing command line and menu-based systems, to the mid-90’s when the Web first toddled onto the scene, to now, when designers are intent on crafting good experiences. After 10 years of consulting, Indi founded Adaptive Path with six other partners in 2001, all hoping to spread good design around the world, making things easier for people everywhere. Indi’s mental models have helped both start-ups and large corporations discover and support customer behaviors they didn’t think to explore at first. She has written a book about the mental model method, Mental Models – aligning design strategy with human behavior, published by Rosenfeld Media. She is now consulting independently, conducting mental model workshops, and mentoring.

Books, Crowdsourcing, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Engage!

March 17, 2011

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The ultimate guide to branding and building your business in the era of the Social Web.

Engage! thoroughly examines the social media landscape and how to effectively use social media to succeed in business?one network and one tool at a time. It leads you through the detailed and specific steps required for conceptualizing, implementing, managing, and measuring a social media program. The result is the ability to increase visibility, build communities of loyal brand enthusiasts, and increase profits.

Covering everything you need to know about social media marketing and the rise of the new social consumer, Engage! shows you how to create effective strategies based on proven examples and earn buy-in from your marketing teams. Even better, you’ll learn how to measure success and ROI.

Introduces you to the psychology, behavior, and influence of the new social consumer
Shows how to define and measure the success of your social media campaigns for the short and long term
Features an inspiring Foreword by actor Ashton Kutcher, who has more than 5 million followers on Twitter
Revised paperback edition brings the book completely up to date to stay ahead of the lightning fast world of social media

Today, no business can afford to ignore the social media revolution. If you’re not using social media to reach out to your customers and the people who influence them, who is?

Books, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Clout: The Art and Science of Influential Web Content

December 17, 2010

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Results. Everyone wants them, whether to sell more products, spread good ideas, or win more funding. In our busy digital world, the way to results is influencing people on the web. But how?

An ad campaign won’t cut it. A Twitter account doesn’t guarantee it. Manipulative tricks will backfire. Instead, you need quality, compelling web content that attracts people and engages them for the long haul.

Clout explains the key principles of influence and how to apply them to web content. Along the way, those principles come to life with practical examples from HowStuffWorks.com, Newell Rubbermaid, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and many more brands. With this book, you’ll:

* Discover why a technology feature, marketing campaign, SEO effort, or redesign aren’t enough to influence online.
* Understand the business value of compelling web content.
* Learn 8 principles for influence from the art of rhetoric and the science of psychology.
* Find out what context is and why it’s so important to influence.
* Jump start your planning for content with a content brief.

Books, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies

Gamestorming: A Playbook for Innovators, Rulebreakers, and Changemakers

August 29, 2010

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Great things don’t happen in a vacuum. But creating an environment for creative thinking and innovation can be a daunting challenge. How can you make it happen at your company? The answer may surprise you: gamestorming.

This book includes more than 80 games to help you break down barriers, communicate better, and generate new ideas, insights, and strategies. The authors have identified tools and techniques from some of the world’s most innovative professionals, whose teams collaborate and make great things happen. This book is the result: a unique collection of games that encourage engagement and creativity while bringing more structure and clarity to the workplace. Find out why — and how — with Gamestorming.

  • Overcome conflict and increase engagement with team-oriented games
  • Improve collaboration and communication in cross-disciplinary teams with visual-thinking techniques
  • Improve understanding by role-playing customer and user experiences
  • Generate better ideas and more of them, faster than ever before
  • Shorten meetings and make them more productive
  • Simulate and explore complex systems, interactions, and dynamics
  • Identify a problem’s root cause, and find the paths that point toward a solution
Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Designing Inclusive Interactions Between People and Products in Their Contexts of Use

February 28, 2010

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Designing Inclusive Interactions contains the proceedings of the fifth Cambridge Workshop on Universal Access and Assistive Technology (CWUAAT), incorporating the 8th Cambridge Workshop on Rehabilitation Robotics, held in Cambridge, England, in March 2010. It contains contributions from an international group of leading researchers in the fields of Universal Access and Assistive Technology.Although the book will be divided into four main parts yet to be named, this conference will mainly focus on the following principal topics: 1. Designing assistive and rehabilitation technology for working and daily living environments2. Measuring inclusion for the design of products for work and daily living3. Inclusive interaction design and new technologies for inclusive design4. Assembling new user data for inclusive design5. The design of accessible and inclusive contexts: work and daily living environments6. Business advantages and applications of inclusive design7. Legislation, standards and government awareness of inclusive designReflecting the spirit of recent moves to extend rights to equitable participation in society for all, this series of workshops and accompanying books is aimed at a broad range of interests, with a general focus on the development of products and solutions. Numerous case studies and examples of good practice are used to raise awareness of the challenges faced in developing truly inclusive products.

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Tools

Beyond the Usability Lab

February 2, 2010

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Usability testing and user experience research typically take place in a controlled lab with small groups. While this type of testing is essential to user experience design, more companies are also looking to test large sample sizes to be able compare data according to specific user populations and see how their experiences differ across user groups. But few usability professionals have experience in setting up these studies, analyzing the data, and presenting it in effective ways. Online usability testing offers the solution by allowing testers to elicit feedback simultaneously from 1,000s of users. Beyond the Usability Lab offers tried and tested methodologies for conducting online usability studies. It gives practitioners the guidance they need to collect a wealth of data through cost-effective, efficient, and reliable practices. The reader will develop a solid understanding of the capabilities of online usability testing, when it’s appropriate to use and not use, and will learn about the various types of online usability testing techniques.

Books, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Online Consumer Psychology: Understanding and Influencing Consumer Behavior in the Virtual World

January 27, 2005

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Online Consumer Psychology addresses many of the issues created by the Internet and goes beyond the topic of advertising and the Web to include topics such as customization, site design, word of mouth processes, and the study of consumer decision making while online. The theories and research methods help provide greater insight into the processes underlying consumer behavior in online environments. Broken into six sections, this book: focuses on community and looks at the Internet’s ability to bring like-minded individuals from around the world into one forum; examines issues related to advertising, specifically click-through rates and advertising content placed within gaming online and wireless networks; provides readers with reasons why consumers customize products and the benefits of customization; discusses the psychological effects of site design; asks the question of whether the Internet empowers consumers to make better decisions; and discusses research tools that can be used online.