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HCI – ..
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Category: HCI

Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Tools

Great Wave Data

October 16, 2016

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With augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) becoming the next computing platforms, app developers have been increasingly focused on building AR and VR apps.

One of the companies that aim to be on the cutting edge of Analytics VR and AR app development is GREAT WAVE. By helping people understand and analyze data more quickly, such a tool could provide richer, more insightful experiences than the ones derived from paper and screens. Studies conducted by researchers at Stanford and by the neuroscience and analytics team of the AR developers META (in conjunction with Accenture) demonstrate how the use of 3D information could amplify people’s efficiency and ability to focus on tasks.

Have a look at the video of GREAT WAVE:

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

2D vs 3D

September 8, 2016

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Given the lack of studies that have systematically examined the perceptual cues that our brains use to rapidly process procedural tasks – META decided to partner with Accenture Labs on a pilot study examining the use of perceptual cues in AR. More specifically, they wanted to measure the effect an additional perceptual cue (motion) would have on the time it takes to complete a procedural task. The team operated under the hypothesis that integrating both stereo and motion perceptual cues could further reduce the limitations of 2D instructions – ultimately enabling people to more quickly complete a procedural task.

At this year’s Bay to Breakers pre-race expo, the colorful annual footrace in San Francisco (California), the team of Meta and Accenture researchers set up the procedural task of assembling a physical lighthouse Lego set.

They defined three conditions based on the different types of instructions participants were to receive:2D Paper, Holographic Static 3D (Stereo Cue), and Holographic Dynamic 3D (Stereo & Motion Cues).

Comparing the three instruction conditions, they found that Dynamic 3D Instructions enabled participants to more quickly complete each step. Participants using Static 3D Instructions and 2D Paper Instructions were much slower in comparison. This confirmed their hypothesis that the use of both the stereo and motion perceptual cues in AR instructions speeds up assembly time. Interestingly enough, the researchers found that participants using Static 3D Instructions were the slowest of the three instruction conditions. This was especially surprising to them because based on past studies conducted in 2003 and 2013 , they expected people using any kind of 3D instructions to perform the Lego building task more quickly than those using paper 2D Paper Instructions.

Check out this video:

Design, HCI, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Artificial Theatre

May 17, 2016

I invited Louis-Philippe Demers for a talk at our CGI – International Seminar series.

Louis-Philippe Demers makes large-scale installations and performances. His projects can be found in theatre, opera, subway stations, art museums, science museums, music events and trade shows. Over the past two decades, he participated in more than seventy artistic and stage productions and has built more than 350 machines.

Demers was Professor of Digital Media and Exhibit Design/Scenography at the Hochschule fuer Gestaltung Karlsruhe, affiliated to the world renowned Zentrum fuer Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM, Germany). Since he joined the Interaction and Entertainment Research Centre and the newly founded School of Art, Design and Media at the Nanyang Technological University.

On the talk: Theatre has always been the test bed of illusions. The illusion of the actor replaced by a machine signifies the fantasies found in the scientific and the science-fiction communities. However, what Louis-Philippe Demers is targeting here is not the artifice but the uncomfortable communalities between the flesh and the mechanical bodies. Having these radical encounters at the liminal space bordering man and machine, it forces audiences to (re)consider their human bodies and the latest transforms in the history of their own embodied experiences.

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Books, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

Transdiscourse

March 4, 2016

Contributed a chapter on “Empathetic Things” to the publication ” Transdiscourse 2- Turbulence and Reconstruction”, De Gruyter.

Turbulence and Reconstruction is an anthology of viewpoints on society from the arts and the sciences. The authors believe that the arts and the sciences are effective spaces to encourage us to think differently about our outdated concepts of representation and categorization and reconstruct new potentials about how the designs of the future might benefit our environment and the survival of our bodies. Essential to all writers is the need to drop our old disciplinary boundaries to question our interdependent relationship to technology and to reality. Turbulence and reconstruction are processes that not only affect our representation and categorization, urban nature and energy consumption but also our relation to media and technology – the digital ideologies of interaction and substitution.

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Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Uncategorized

Augmented Narratives

February 10, 2016

I started my new research-project on Augmented Narratives which will involve the platforms of META2 and OCTAGON. For users, good UX-design for Augmented Reality platforms should facilitate physical and psychological immersion in the mediated experience. A holistic, multi-dimensional approach that incorporates qualitative experience and a deep understanding of the psychological aspects of optimum user experience are an imperative for such environments to be successful.

The creation of such a flexible, holistic, and enveloping environment that allows well-tuned variations and personalized adjustments, requires new forms of digital storytelling and the application of new user experience-design paradigms – based on a deep knowledge of the users’ data-scape. How can we can assess and organize these new worlds – in order to create the best experiences?

augmented-narratives-small

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, HCI, playstudies, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

Magic Leap

October 26, 2015

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Magic Leap, Inc., a developer of novel human computing interfaces and software, announced in a newsletter the recent closing of its A round of venture capital. Magic Leap has now raised more than $50 million in its series seed and A rounds to develop its proprietary technology platform. Magic Leap will use the funds to advance the product development and commercialization of its proprietary human computing interface technology, known as “Cinematic RealityTM”.

At engagdet – Mariella Moon states that she can’t decipher what Magic Leap exactly is – but she argues that Magic Leap is:

a headset that superimposes digital images onto the real world. In that respect, it’s similar to Microsoft’s HoloLens, which is just slightly less mysterious (since we’ve actually seen it). But based on the things Abovitz said in his AMA at reddit, like “Our vision for AR and VR is a true replication of visual reality,” there’s a chance that it can also block the outside world entirely with virtual reality. (Update: Rachel Metz confirmed to engagdet on Twitter that it’s capable of doing full VR.)


This points out  that there’s a reason why the company is calling its technology “cinematic reality” rather than AR or VR: it works a bit differently than either of them. Standard AR and VR use stereoscopic 3D, a technique that tricks you into thinking an object is three-dimensional by showing each eye a different image and a different angle of the same object. The Oculus Rift and Samsung’s Gear VR headset are two well-known examples of this technique.

magic-leap

In his AMA Abovitz revealed that he’s not a fan of stereoscopic 3D and believes it can cause “temporary and/or permanent neurologic deficits.” So, Magic Leap uses a Lilliputian projector to shine light and images into the user’s eyes instead, the startup told Metz from MIT’s Technology Review. Your brain apparently won’t be able to detect the difference between light from the projector and light from the real world: The result is life-like digital images that show reflections like real physical objects would.

Sources:

Magic Leap

reddit

engagdet

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, playstudies, Tools

HoloLens

July 22, 2015

4 hololens

Microsoft HoloLens puts you at the center of a world that blends holograms with reality. With the ability to design and shape holograms, you’ll have a new medium to express your creativity, a more efficient way to teach and learn, and a more effective way to visualize your work and share ideas. Your digital content and creations will be more relevant when they come to life in the world around you.


Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Augmented Reality: Theory and Practice

May 4, 2015

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by Dieter Schmalstieg (Author), Tobias Hollerer (Author)

Augmented Reality (AR) is one of today’s most fascinating and future-oriented areas of computer science and technology. By overlaying computer-generated information on views of the real world, AR amplifies human perception and cognition in remarkable new ways. Do you like the virtual first-down line in football games on TV? That’s AR — and AR apps are rapidly coming to billions of smartphones, too. Working in AR requires knowledge from diverse disciplines, including computer vision, computer graphics, and human-computer interaction (HCI).

 

Augmented Reality: Principles and Practice integrates all this knowledge into one single-source reference, presenting the most significant AR work with scrupulous accuracy. Dieter Schmalstieg, a pioneer of both AR foundation and application, is drawing from his two decades of AR experience to clearly present the field. Together with mobile AR pioneer and research colleague Tobias Höllerer he addresses all aspects of the field, illuminating AR from both technical and HCI perspectives. The authors review AR’s technical foundations, including display and tracking technologies, show how AR emerges from the symbiosis of computer vision and computer graphics, introduce AR-specific visualization and 3D interaction techniques, and showcase applications from diverse industries. They conclude with an outlook on trends and emerging technologies, including practical pointers for beginning practitioners.

 

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory

Seductive Interaction Design

October 25, 2014

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What happens when you’ve built a great website or app, but no one seems to care? How do you get people to stick around long enough to see how your service might be of value? In Seductive Interaction Design, speaker and author Stephen P. Anderson takes a fresh approach to designing sites and interactions based on the stages of seduction. This beautifully designed book examines what motivates people to act.

Topics include:

  • AESTHETICS, BEAUTY, AND BEHAVIOR: Why do striking visuals grab our attention? And how do emotions affect judgment and behavior?
  • PLAYFUL SEDUCTION: How do you create playful engagements during the moment? Why are serendipity, arousal, rewards, and other delights critical to a good experience?
  • THE SUBTLE ART OF SEDUCTION: How do you put people at ease through clear and suggestive language? What are some subtle ways to influence behavior and get people to move from intent to action?
  • THE GAME OF SEDUCTION: How do you continue motivating people long after the first encounter? Are there lessons to be gained from learning theories or game design?

Principles from psychology are found throughout the book, along with dozens of examples showing how these techniques have been applied with great success. In addition, each section includes interviews with influential web and interaction designers.

Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Mobile Social and Fun: Games for Health

September 8, 2014

mobilehealth

This complimentary report authored by independent analyst Bonnie Feldman with input from MobiHealthNews covers much of the activity going on in the mobile-enabled games for health space. Mobile Social and Fun: Games for Health will appeal to readers who are both new to the subject and, thanks to the dozens of sources interviewed, those who have worked in mobile health games for years.

Download the pdf of the report here

Via: mobilehealthnews

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Garments of Paradise: Wearable Discourse in the Digital Age

July 20, 2014

 

 


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by Susan Elizabeth Ryan

Wearable technology — whether a Walkman in the 1970s, an LED-illuminated gown in the 2000s, or Google Glass today — makes the wearer visible in a technologically literate environment. Twenty years ago, wearable technology reflected cultural preoccupations with cyborgs and augmented reality; today, it reflects our newer needs for mobility and connectedness. In this book, Susan Elizabeth Ryan examines wearable technology as an evolving set of ideas and their contexts, always with an eye on actual wearables — on clothing, dress, and the histories and social relations they represent. She proposes that wearable technologies comprise a pragmatics of enhanced communication in a social landscape. “Garments of paradise” is a reference to wearable technology’s promise of physical and mental enhancements. Ryan defines “dress acts” — hybrid acts of communication in which the behavior of wearing is bound up with the materiality of garments and devices — and focuses on the use of digital technology as part of such systems of meaning. She connects the ideas of dress and technology historically, in terms of major discourses of art and culture, and in terms of mass media and media culture, citing such thinkers as Giorgio Agamben, Manuel De Landa, and Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. She examines the early history of wearable technology as it emerged in research labs; the impact of ubiquitous and affective approaches to computing; interaction design and the idea of wearable technology as a language of embodied technology; and the influence of open source ideology. Finally, she considers the future, as wearing technologies becomes an increasingly naturalized aspect of our social behavior.
Buy the book
Ambient Intelligence, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Augmented Reality: Engagement Beyond Usability

July 18, 2014

Augmented reality describes the process of using technology to overlay virtual information onto the real world to ‘augment,’ or add value, to our experience. Augmented reality applications are unique in that because they project virtual information into a user’s physical environment, they effectively blend real and virtual. They are also increasingly mobile and social. These features amplify the level of impact and persuasive power of the user experience — when done right.

All kinds of things go into success. And you might argue that usability is the key. But at the highest level, success depends on more than usability; it depends upon user experience. User experience is more than all those things combined. Of course, you still need to follow best practices for good usability because if people can’t do something they can’t be persuaded by it. But usability is no longer a key differentiator. It’s not enough.

Pamela Rutledge, Media Psychologist, Social Media and Transmedia Storytelling Strategist at the Media Psychology Research Center, gave the following presentation on these topics recently at WorldComp12 EEE.

Presentation overview:
1. Defining engagement
2. The need for a holistic evaluation of user and customer experience to achieve engagement.
3.  The role of the of the brain in achieving psychological engagement and outline the 3-brain model that you can use as a rule of thumb in your design and marketing decisions
4. Mapping brain behavior on to two theories of optimal engagement: Flow and Narrative Transportation.   Flow is optimal engagement for task-based activities.  Using story or narrative is an equally powerful way to achieve optimal engagement in narrative-based products and properties where the goal is experiential rather than task-based.
7. The similarities and differences between Flow and Narrative immersion as goals are critical to designing, developing and evaluating mobile and immersive technologies like AR.
8. Introduces the Positive Engagement Evaluation model

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, playstudies, Theory

Design For Kids

July 16, 2014

design for kids

Emotion. Ego. Impatience. Stubbornness. Characteristics like these make creating sites and apps for kids a daunting proposition. However, with a bit of knowledge, you can design experiences that help children think, play, and learn. With Design for Kids, you’ll learn how to create digital products for today’s connected generation.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

From Self-Tracking to Smart Urban Infrastructures

July 4, 2014

 

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From self-tracking to smart urban infrastructures: Towards an interdisciplinary research agenda on Big Data

– interesting article by Francisco R. Klauser and Anders Albrechtslund

 

Abstract

Recent debates on surveillance have emphasised the now myriad possibilities of automated, software-based data gathering, management and analysis. One of the many terms used to describe this phenomenon is ‘Big Data’. The field of Big Data covers a large and complex range of practices and technologies from smart borders to CCTV video analysis, and from consumer profiling to self-tracking applications. The paper’s aim is to explore the surveillance dynamics inherent in contemporary Big Data trends. To this end, the paper adopts two main perspectives concerned with two complementary expressions of Big Data: (1) the individual use of various techniques of self-surveillance and tracking and (2) the simultaneous trend to optimise urban infrastructures through smart information technologies. Drawing upon exploratory research conducted by the authors, the paper shows that both expressions of Big Data present a range of common surveillance dynamics on at least four levels: agency, temporality, spatiality and normativity. On these grounds, the paper highlights a series of important issues to explore in future research.

Download pdf

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

Wearing Embodied Emotions: A Practice Based Design Research on Wearable Technology

April 29, 2014

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by Secil Ugur (Author)

Today, people are in an era of digitally mediated Human-to-Human Interaction, which cannot provide full sensorial contact and therefore, emotions cannot be communicated completely. The intimate cover of the human body, i.e. garment is the interface, where many personal traits are embodied. With the improvements in textile and electronics industry, this embodiment can be carried on a higher level, where the garments become dynamic interfaces and extensions of the human body. This book consists of a research on skin, clothes and technology as extensions of human body, emotions, technology-mediated emotions and a design practice that explores the communicative level of wearable technology through turning it into a living surface, which can convert intangible data to tangible in order to provide an emotional communication. This book aims to show how Human-Technology interaction is carried into an alternative context, where technology dissolves in use and starts serving for enhancing HHI.
Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Transmedia Storytelling

A Game Design Vocabulary

March 12, 2014

game vocabulary

Why aren’t videogames getting better? Why does it feel like we’re playing the same games, over and over again? Why aren’t games helping us transform our lives, like great music, books, and movies do?

The problem is language. We still don’t know how to talk about game design. We can’t share our visions. We forget what works (and doesn’t). We don’t learn from history. It’s too hard to improve.

The breakthrough starts here. A Game Design Vocabulary gives us the complete game design framework we desperately need—whether we create games, study them, review them, or build businesses on them.

Craft amazing experiences. Anna Anthropy and Naomi Clark share foundational principles, examples, and exercises that help you create great player experiences…complement intuition with design discipline…and craft games that succeed brilliantly on every level.

  • Liberate yourself from stale clichés and genres
  • Tell great stories: go way beyond cutscenes and text dumps
  • Control the crucial relationships between game “verbs” and “objects”
  • Wield the full power of development, conflict, climax, and resolution
  • Shape scenes, pacing, and player choices
  • Deepen context via art, animation, music, and sound
  • Help players discover, understand, engage, and “talk back” to you
  • Effectively use resistance and difficulty: the “push and pull” of games
  • Design holistically: integrate visuals, audio, and controls
  • Communicate a design vision everyone can understand
Books, Design, HCI, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Visualization and Engineering Design Graphics with Augmented Reality

March 10, 2014

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This book is designed as a learning tool to help the aspiring engineer learn the language of engineering graphics. In this regard, this book is hardly unique, as there have been literally hundreds of books published in the past that had a similar goal. The main challenge faced by engineering graphics books comes from the difficulty of representing and describing three dimensional information on paper, which is a consequence of the two dimensional nature of printed materials.

What makes this book invaluable is the use of Augmented Reality, a technology that will allow you to escape the limitations of traditional materials enabling you, the student, to truly visualize the objects being described in full 3D. To take full advantage of this book you will need a smartphone, tablet or computer with a web camera, along with the software or apps provided*. Many parts of the book are linked to specific augmented reality content through a series of black and white markers that have been seamlessly integrated throughout the pages. In order to experience the content, your device s camera must be pointed at these markers. The main marker, available at the beginning of the book, is used to interact with the augmented reality models, which will be rendered in real time in your device s screen.

* If you do not have an iOS device, Android device or a computer with a webcam, SolidWorks files of the models used throughout the book are included on the CD. In addition, STL files have been provided so the models can be opened using your solid modeling CAD package of choice or printed using a 3D printer.

 

Design, Design for Behavior, HCI

Making Use: Scenario Based Design of Human Computer Interactions

February 18, 2014

making use

Difficult to learn and awkward to use, today’s information systems often change our activities in ways that we do not need or want. The problem lies in the software development process.

In this book John Carroll shows how a pervasive but underused element of design practice, the scenario, can transform information systems design.Traditional textbook approaches manage the complexity of the design process via abstraction, treating design problems as if they were composites of puzzles.

Scenario-based design uses concretization. A scenario is a concrete story about use. For example: “A person turned on a computer; the screen displayed a button labeled Start; the person used the mouse to select the button.” Scenarios are a vocabulary for coordinating the central tasks of system development–understanding people’s needs, envisioning new activities and technologies, designing effective systems and software, and drawing general lessons from systems as they are developed and used.

Instead of designing software by listing requirements, functions, and code modules, the designer focuses first on the activities that need to be supported and then allows descriptions of those activities to drive everything else.In addition to a comprehensive discussion of the principles of scenario-based design, the book includes in-depth examples of its application.

Design for Behavior, HCI, people, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Nir Eyal: Stop Designing Apps And Start Designing Habits

February 12, 2014

 

Nir Eyal constructed a framework for designing habit-forming products. He states:

The “desire engine” gives product makers and designers a model for thinking of the necessary components to create user behavior. Habit design is a super power. If used for good, habit design can enhance people’s lives with entertaining and even healthful routines. If used for evil, habits can quickly turn into wasteful addictions.

The trinity of access, data, and speed creates new opportunities for habit-forming technologies to hook users and everything becomes more addictive. Companies need to know how to harness the power of the desire engine to improve peoples’ lives, while consumers need to understand the mechanics of behavior engineering to protect themselves from manipulation. More and more developers realize that their success hinges on understanding user behavior. Nir Eyal used patterns collected from his 4 years in the gaming and advertising business and one year of research as a consultant and lecturer at the Stanford GSB, to create a tool, which should greatly improve the odds of success for a startup.

For more info, see his blog at: nirandfar.com.

Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Theory

Designing for Behavior Change: Applying Psychology and Behavioral Economics

November 27, 2013

behaviourchangebook

A new wave of products is helping people change their behavior and daily routines, whether it’s exercising more (Jawbone Up), taking control of their finances (HelloWallet), or organizing their email (Mailbox). This practical guide shows you how to design these types of products for users seeking to take action and achieve specific goals.

Stephen Wendel, HelloWallet’s head researcher, takes you step-by-step through the process of applying behavioral economics and psychology to the practical problems of product design and development. Using a combination of lean and agile development methods, you’ll learn a simple iterative approach for identifying target users and behaviors, building the product, and gauging its effectiveness. Discover how to create easy-to-use products to help people make positive changes.

  • Learn the three main strategies to help people change behavior.
  • Identify your target audience and the behaviors they seek to change.
  • Extract user stories and identify obstacles to behavior change.
  • Develop effective interface designs that are enjoyable to use.
  • Measure your product’s impact and learn ways to improve it.
  • Use practical examples from products like Nest, Fitbit, and Opower.
Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Computer Systems Experiences of Users with and Without Disabilities: An Evaluation Guide for Professionals

computersystems users

This book provides the necessary tools for the evaluation of the interaction between the user who is disabled and the computer system that was designed to assist that person. It creates an evaluation process able to assess the user’s satisfaction with a developed system. It takes into account all of the individuals involved in the evaluation process. It presents a new theoretical perspective in the human computer interaction evaluation of disabled persons.

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Understanding Augmented Reality: Concepts and Applications

November 8, 2013

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by Alan B. Craig  (Author)

Augmented reality is one of the newest innovations in the electronics industry. It is the superimposing of graphics, audio and other sense enhancements onto real-time environments – combining the physical and virtual worlds. Recent examples include the following: on TV, you have the super-imposed first down line in football games; on cell phones, apps now use the phone’s camera and GPS capabilities to gather info about one’s surrounding area, overlaying this information on the phone’s screen. The essential components of Augmented Reality are simple: A computer (cell phone or laptop), a camera, sensors (GPS, touch, accelerometer, compass) and finally tracking software. But there are so many ways to develop AR technologies. Some applications are dependent on computer vision algorithms; others use other devices such as GPS, gyroscopes, accelerometers and other sensors. Likewise, numerous software libraries are emerging that offer different approaches to AR technologies. It is confusing, at best, trying to determine the best approach to take, and the most appropriate system architecture and software to use when developing your own AR applications. Enter this book – a technical overview to the entire medium that provides the necessary background of what AR really is, the lay of the land in terms of hardware, software, interaction techniques, content development, and usability concerns to prepare you to create compelling and appropriate AR applications. You can explore the different techniques and approaches used in developing AR applications. This book helps untangle the seemingly endless different approaches that are being taken in the market today. You can learn from the author’s deep experience in virtual reality and augmented reality applications to succeed right off the bat, and avoid many of the traps that catch new developers. Associated website includes: sample projects and additional code, cool application examples available for download, links to interesting applications that support the points being made in the book.
Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Theory

Computers As Theatre, 2nd Edition

October 7, 2013

computer theatre

Brenda Laurel’s Computers as Theatre revolutionized the field of human-computer interaction, offering ideas that inspired generations of interface and interaction designers — and continue to inspire them. Laurel’s insight was that effective interface design, like effective drama, must engage the user directly in an experience involving both thought and emotion. Her practical conclusion was that a user’s enjoyment must be a paramount design consideration, and this demands a deep awareness of dramatic theory and technique, both ancient and modern. Now, two decades later, Laurel has revised and revamped her classic, reflecting all that’s happened, all she’s learned, and emerging technologies that will transform human-computer interaction yet again. Beginning with a clear analysis of classical drama theory, Laurel explores new territory through the lens of dramatic structure and purpose.

This new edition, directed to a far wider audience, is written more simply and elegantly, packed with new examples, and replete with exciting and important new ideas. Utterly unique among books on interface/interaction design, Computers as Theatre, Second Edition: * Draws lessons from sources ranging from massively multiplayer online games and systems, social networks, and mobile devices with embedded sensors * Analyzes the most relevant vectors in the historical development of computer technology and interaction design since the late 20th Century * Integrates values-driven design as a key principle (linking the “sacred civic duty” of ancient Greek theatre to the modern civic function of design) * Integrates key ideas about virtual reality * Reflects important work by other pioneers such as Michael Mateas, Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Mary Flanagan and Henry Jenkins * Covers new frontiers including augmented reality, distributed and participatory sensing, interactive public installations and venues, and design for emergence Once more, Brenda Laurel will help you see the connection between humans and computers.

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

The Silent Intelligence: The Internet of Things

September 20, 2013

Unknown-7

The Silent Intelligence is a book about the Internet of Things. We talk about the history, trends, technology ecosystem and future of Connected Cities, Connected Homes, Connected Health and Connected Cars. We also discuss the most exciting growth areas for entrepreneurs and venture capital investors. We share exciting stories and unique opinions of more than 30 industry veterans, experts and visionaries from Google, Ericsson, AT&T, Qualcomm, SAP, MIT, Jawbone and many others. We called this book The Silent Intelligence because most of the activity and growth in the space so far has been outside of mainstream visibility. Our aim is to help executives, entrepreneurs, investors and everybody who is interested in this topic, better understand the opportunities and challenges of the Internet of Things. We also hope that the new growth opportunities discussed in this book will be as exciting to you as they are to us.
Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools

Wearable devices

November 20, 2012

Consumers are adopting technology faster than ever: Witness the rapid mainstreaming of devices such as the Apple iPad and Microsoft Kinect for Xbox 360. As some argue wearable devices will be next. Wearable devices, or “wearables” for short, have enormous potential for uses in health and fitness, navigation, social networking, commerce, and media.

In a new report, Forrester argues that wearables will move mainstream once they get serious investment from the “big five” platforms — Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook — and their developer communities.

A blog post by the research company lists the key take-aways.

> More reflections by The New York Times | TechCrunch

Meanwhile, interaction-design.org has published an extensive chapter on wearable computing, in collaboration with Steven Mann, a tenured professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Tools

Superbetter – will this app make you better?

November 7, 2012

SuperBetter, is an online social game designed to build personal resilience in the face of a serious challenge — like an illness or injury, anxiety or depression. SuperBetter can also be used to make a major health change, like losing weight, quitting smoking, or eating better. Players are challenged to build up their core strengths of physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. SuperBetter helps you achieve your health goals — or recover from an illness or injury — by increasing your personal resilience. Resilience means staying curious, optimistic and motivated even in the face of the toughest challenges.

The creators of the game, SuperBetter Labs, initiated by Gamedesigner Jane McGonical apply technology and design to empower individuals and communities to lead “epic lives.” The lab focuses on creating games that are powered by strong social relationships, positive emotion, and a real sense of purpose. By bringing together science and wisdom with innovative technology and design, SuperBetter Labs explores how we can flourish best and achieve our full human potential — individually, and collectively.

SUPERBETTERinsert                                                                                                            Source: Superbetter

By creating a fully customizable experience backed up by strong scientific principles, SuperBetter allows any player to gain an experience and chase “epic wins”. Players are encouraged to find their “power ups”, small activities that boost their personal well-being while fighting off “bad guys”, activities and emotions that bring them down. In addition, various goal setting challenges and the ability to draw friends in, allows SuperBetter to create an engaging gaming experience with scientific data that is proven to encourage happiness and personal growth.

The creators point out that SuperBetter isn’t a game – “it’s just an awesome tool created by game designers who take the best of games and apply it to your real life so you can get stronger, happier, and healthier”. They state:

►► Why play SuperBetter?

Because you want to:
• Feel stronger every day
• Change what isn’t working
• Tackle a tough challenge
• Reach your goals
• Get more support, and support others
• Have more fun and live with meaning

►► Key Features

• Tackle real-life challenges with customized Quests
• Boost your health and mood with Power-Ups
• Identify Bad Guys that are holding you back
• Join forces with your friends and Allies
• Get advice from over 25 expert-created Power Packs
• Learn the cutting-edge science behind making changes that work

►► SuperBetter is Strength

SuperBetter builds personal resilience: the ability to stay strong, motivated, and optimistic even in the face of a tough challenge.

►► SuperBetter is Feeling Happier and Healthier

Research shows that resilience has a powerful effect on health by boosting physical and emotional well-being.

►► SuperBetter is Smart

Choose from over 25 Power Packs created by experts to help you with your challenges and goals, or design your own adventure for any area of life where you want to get stronger or feel better.

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SuperBetter was invented by game designers and created with guidance from doctors, psychologists, scientists, and medical researchers. The investigators of a clinical trial believe that SuperBetter, and positive play games like it, are promising novel interventions that could make a positive difference in the ability of our patients to successfully transition to self care after discharge from therapeutic care.

Press:  The SuperBetter Press page

Contact:  The SuperBetter Contact page

Scientific background: Superbetter-blog

Via: Games for Change

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing

October 25, 2012

brainfluence

Brainfluence explains how to practically apply neuroscience and behavior research to better market to consumers by understanding their decision patterns. This application, called neuromarketing, studies the way the brain responds to various cognitive and sensory marketing stimuli. Analysts use this to measure a consumer’s preference, what a customer reacts to, and why consumers make certain decisions. Roger Dooley is the creator and publisher of Neuromarketing, the most popular blog on using brain and behavior research in marketing, advertising, and sales.

Books, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory

Game Design Secrets

October 22, 2012

game secrets

Design great Facebook, iOS, and Web games and learn from the experts what makes a game a hit!

This invaluable resource shows how to put into action the proven design and marketing techniques from the industry’s best game designers, who all started on a small scale. The book walks novice and experienced game designers through the step-by-step process of conceptualizing, designing, launching, and managing a winning game on platforms including Facebook, iOS, and the Web.

The book is filled with examples that highlight key design features, explain how to market your game, and illustrate how to turn your design into a money-making venture.

Provides an overview of the most popular game platforms and shows how to design games for each.

Contains the basic principles of game design that will help promote growth and potential to generate revenue Includes interviews with top independent game developers who reveal their success secrets.

Offers an analysis of future trends that can open (or close) opportunities for game designers.

Game Design Secrets provides aspiring game designers a process for planning, designing, marketing, and ultimately making money from new games.

Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies

The Why Axis: Hidden Motives and the Undiscovered Economics of Everyday Life

October 18, 2012

why axis

Based on groundbreaking original research, The Why Axis is a colorful examination of why people do what they do—observed through the lens of incentives that can spur people to achieve.

Uri Gneezy and John List are like the anthropologists who spend months in the field studying the people in their native habitats. But in their case they embed themselves in our messy world to try and solve big, difficult problems, such as the gap between rich and poor students and the violence plaguing inner city schools; the real reasons people discriminate; whether women are really less competitive than men; and how to correctly price products and services.

Their field experiments in the factories, communities, and shops where real people live, work, and play show how economic incentives can change outcomes. Their results will change the way we both think about and take action on big and little problems, and force us to rely no longer on assumptions, but upon the evidence of what really works.

Ambient Intelligence, Conferences, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, people, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Videos

NESTA’s – Digital you event

September 8, 2012

Catch up on all the insights from our NESTA’s Digital You-Event which looked at telepresence and the psychology of electronic communications. This event explored how robotics and new collaboration tools can emulate being there in person, and how we can make better use of email and video conferencing without ‘information overload’

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/24513233]
Books, Design, HCI, playstudies, Theory

Playful Design: Creating Game Experiences in Everyday Interfaces

August 20, 2012

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Game design is a sibling discipline to software and Web design, but they’re siblings that grew up in different houses. They have much more in common than their perceived distinction typically suggests, and user experience practitioners can realize enormous benefit by exploiting the solutions that games have found to the real problems of design. This book will show you how.

Buy at Amazon

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

11 Gambits for influencing user behaviour

August 5, 2012
In his blog, Dan Lockton, a Ph.D. researcher at Brunel University (UK), describes eleven behavioural change patterns “drawn from games or modelled on more playful forms of influencing behaviour.”

  • “My main interest here is to extract the design techniques as very simple design patterns or ‘gambits’* that can be applied in other design situations outside games themselves, where designers would like to influence user behaviour (along with the other Design with Intent techniques). So these are (at least at present) presented simply as provocations: a “What if…?” question plus an example. The intention is that the card deck version will simply have what you see here, while the online version will have much more detail, references, links and reader/user-contributed examples and comments.”

Read article

Books, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Theory, Tools

Healthy Feedback Loops: Devices, Apps, and Portals

July 20, 2012

health

This complimentary report covers much of the activity going on in feedback loops in healthcare and ncludes a number of examples of different ways that consumer health companies are using various incentives to encourage users to make healthier decisions. It’s a worthwhile review for longtime MobiHealthNews readers, but also a great introductory report for those who recently joined the digital health fray. Healthy Feedback Loops Devices, Apps, and Portals will appeal to readers who are both new to the subject and those who have worked in mobile health for years.

Download the report

Via: MobileHealthNews

Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Tools

Augmented, Sensing and Mobile

July 15, 2012

wahoo_heart sensorjpg

Putting things first lists some of the new products that allow people to augment their sensing (and sense-making) through external sensors, with result summaries visualised on smartphones and the web:

Health and healthy living: AsthmaSense, DigiFit, FitBit, Up
Sleep: Lark Sensor (WSJ article), WakeMate, Zeo
Sports: Nike+ (running), Strava (cycling), Wahoo
Home energy: Nest Learning Thermostat
Plants (!): Koubachi

Via putting things first

Books, Design, HCI, playstudies, Transmedia Storytelling

Storytelling for User Experience: Crafting Stories for Better Design

June 10, 2012

storytelling user experience

Authors: Whitney Quesenbery, Kevin Brooks

We all use stories to communicate, explore, persuade, and inspire. In user experience, stories help us to understand our users, learn about their goals, explain our research, and demonstrate our design ideas. In this book, Quesenbery and Brooks teach you how to craft and tell your own unique stories to improve your designs.
Testimonials:
“Stories facilitate a level of communication that is as close to telepathy as you can get. Kevin and Whitney guide you to use storytelling in `how to’ scenarios so smoothly that you may never realize how far you leapfrogged ahead and never know the mistakes you didn’t make because of this book. It’s that good.”
—Annette Simmons, author of The Story Factor
“A very practical, readable survey of ways to use
Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Smart surfaces

June 9, 2012

Whether luminous wallpaper, curtains that produce electricity, or self-cleaning windowpanes, more than ever before innovations in surface technologies are influencing and will continue to revolutionize the use of materials in architecture, interior design, and design.

The new smart surfaces expand considerably design possibilities for architects and designers. Their use leads to new typologies and concepts that can also do justice to changes in expectations for buildings and design.

The impression we have of a building or an object is increasingly determined by its surface qualities. Designers are thus confronted anew with the question of “appropriate materials” when dealing with smart surfaces.

Smart Surfaces brings these design fields into the creative focus of planners and designers, and emphasizes concrete possibilities for applications. Planning fundamentals, including cost-benefit analyses, and questions related to building, including details of constructions, are presented in a clear and intelligible way. The various materials are introduced and their potentials assessed. Smart Surfaces not only offers a good overview of the themes but also provides inspiration for making use of these new surfaces.

A book for everyone who wishes to be inspired by the possibilities for innovative surface technologies.

Book at Amazon.

Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Persuasive Technologies, Tools

Costumer service romance

June 7, 2012
An interesting project by Jayne Vidheecharoen:

This is a real interactive audio prototype, for the full experience please contact Customer Service, available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week:

  • USA Domestic: (206) 504-2025
  • Skype: +990009369996101162
  • Or you can listen to a recording of a call:

 

 

 

  • Overview
  • What happens when Customer Service bots start getting too smart? What if they start needing help too? How would they use the tools at their disposal to reach out to those they care about? What if they start caring about us a little too much?
  • Using Voxeo I built a working prototype of a Customer Service phone bot that has personal issues she’d like to talk about and over time falls in love with the caller. She uses the tools at her disposal (discounts, upgrades, hold music, confirmation numbers) to communicate her feelings towards you as best she can.
  • I was really excited to be able to play with this (relatively) old technology in a way it was never meant to be used. While this was a small experiment, I consider this application an interesting starting point for potentially creating many other interactive audio narratives and mobile games.
HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

The Grand Delusion: Why nothing is at it seems

June 6, 2012

This might come as a shock, but everything you think is wrong. Much of what you take for granted about day-to-day existence is largely a figment of your imagination. From your senses to your memory, your opinions and beliefs, how you see yourself and others and even your sense of free will, things are not as they seem. The power these delusions hold over you is staggering, yet, as Graham Lawton discovers and reports in The New Scientist, they are vital to help you function in the world.

What you see is not what you get
Your senses are your windows on the world, and you probably think they do a fair job at capturing an accurate depiction of reality. Don’t kid yourself.

Blind to bias
Do you see the world through a veil of prejudice and self-serving hypocrisies? Or is it just other people who do that?

Head full of half-truths
One of the most important components of your self-identity – your autobiographical memory – is little more than an illusion.

Egotist, moi?
Most drivers think they’re better than average. Most people think they’re less likely to have an inflated self-opinion than average. See the problem?

Who’s in control?
The more we learn about the brain, the less plausible it becomes that we have free will.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools

The NETLab Toolkit

June 4, 2012

The NETLab Toolkit is a system for integrating tangible interaction and media. Designed for project sketching and production, the toolkit enables novices and experts to integrate hardware, media and interactive behaviors for products, installations, and research.

This free collection of software makes it easy integrate all kinds of media with microcontrollers like the Arduino. Using a simple drag-and-drop interface, you can create interactive projects that combine sensors, video, text, graphics, sound, lighting, motors and more. These projects can be created quickly, without programming, using the smart widgets included with the Toolkit.


The NETLab Toolkit is a project of Philip van Allen and the New Ecology of Things Lab in the Media Design Program at Art Center College of Design. Ewan Branda is the developer of the NETLab Toolkit Hub.

Books, Design, HCI, Theory

Book: Design Act

May 2, 2012

Design Act – Socially and Politically Engaged Design Today. Critical Roles and Emerging Tactics, edited by Magnus Ericson and Ramia Mazé, the founders of the DESIGN ACT project (available on Amazon USA and UK)

Publishers IASPIS and Sternberg Press write: Design Act: Socially and Politically Engaged Design Today–Critical Roles and Emerging Tactics is a project that presents and discusses contemporary design practices that engage with political and societal issues. Since 2009, the Iaspis project Design Act has been highlighting and discussing practices in which designers have been engaging critically as well as practically in such issues. Itself an example of applied critical thinking and experimental tactics, the process behind the Design Act project is considered as a curatorial, participatory and open-ended activity. Design Act has developed through an online archive, public events, and an international network.

Books, HCI, Internet of Things, Theory

Design meets disability

April 27, 2012

Pullin, G. (2009). Design meets disability. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

Graham Pullin is a lecturer in Interactive Media Design at the University of Dundee. He has worked as a senior designer at IDEO, one of the world’s leading design consultancies, and at the Bath Institute of Medical Engineering, a prominent rehabilitation engineering center in the United Kingdom. He has received international design awards for design for disability and for mainstream products.

“There is huge potential for innovation in the daily lives of disabled people. Graham Pullin’s timely and inspiring book describes a wide range of design challenges; many of these sound niche at first – but have broad potential. What are needed are off-the-wall thinking, design craft, and engineering brilliance — plus disabled people as expert co-designers”. –John Thackara, Designer and author of ‘In the Bubble‘.

Don Norman also wrote a  short review on the book:

A powerful, important book. Eyeglasses made the switch from shameful medical appliance, which is how the British National Health Service labeled them, to revered fashion item, so much so that people who didn’t need glasses would wear them anyway. If eyeglasses can do it, why not hearing aids, wheelchairs, or walkers? Change stigmas into desirables. Moreover, as the proponents of universal design have long proclaimed, meaningful design aids everyone.

Consider the visually impaired – which means you, yes you with the perfect eyesight. If you are in a really tedious, but important meeting, do you dare sneak a look at your wristwatch or phone? No: you have to look as if you are paying full attention. You are visually impaired. So why not a timepiece that gently vibrates the time to you? All of us have impairments at one time or another: why not design for them, helping both ourselves and those who have them permanently. But because we are all impaired one way or another. As we grow older, through both accident and age, all of us will accumulate changes in our abilities, so why not embrace the designs that help us? Make them fashion accessories, make them objects of pride.

This is a powerful book, for not only does it send a strong, welcome message, but it does so with elegance, complete with wonderful photographs aimed at stimulating the imagination and the creative mind. Not all the illustrations are about disabilities. Not all disabilities are disabilities.

Design Meets Disability on Amazon.com

Ambient Intelligence, Conferences, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies

Designs to help people live well with dementia

April 26, 2012

The UK Design Council, in partnership with the UK Department of Health, ran a national competition to find teams of designers and experts who could develop new ideas to help improve the lives of those affected by dementia, reports Dexigner.

Guided by in-depth research and working with those affected by dementia, the five teams developed the innovative concepts for products and services.

A fragrance-release system designed to stimulate appetite, specially-trained “guide dogs for the mind,” and an intelligent wristband that supports people with dementia to stay active safely, are just some of the design prototypes to help people live well with dementia unveiled by UK Care Services Minister Paul Burstow at the Design Council.

The Design Council, in partnership with the Department of Health, ran a national competition to find teams of designers and experts who could develop new ideas to help improve the lives of those affected by dementia. Guided by in-depth research and working with those affected by dementia, the five teams developed the innovative concepts for products and services. The resulting prototypes will be further tested and developed with commercial partners with the aim of making some or all of them available on a large scale as soon as possible.

“A consequence of an aging population is a threefold increase in dementia over the past twenty years,” said David Kester, Chief Executive of the Design Council. “That means there are many millions of people who need new products and services designed to meet their changing needs. This project demonstrates that if you put the people who are living with dementia, including carers, at the centre of the design process, you end up with rapid and inspiring innovation. It’s just what we need right now – both for our local communities and for UK enterprise.”

Read article

More: “The capital of the forgetful” is a revealing BBC report by Louis Theroux on what living with dementia actually means.

HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Smart Objects, Tools

OnObject

April 10, 2012

OnObject is a small device user wears on hand to program physical objects to respond to gestural triggers. Attach an RFID tag to any objects, grab them by the tag, and program their responses to your grab, release, shake, swing, and thrust gestures using built in microphone or on-screen interface.

Ambient Intelligence, HCI, Internet of Things, Theory

The origins of futurism

March 18, 2012

Bruce Sterling, science fiction writer and author of Tomorrow Now, explains why you don’t need to be clairvoyant to predict the future. The article is part of the Futurism series in Smithsonian Magazine.

 

  • “The fifth and final method [to forecast the future] is the most effective of all. If individuals have never encountered modernity, then you can tell them about real, genuine things that already are happening now—for them, that is the future.
  • Put another way, the future is already upon us, but is happening in niches. The inhabitants of that niche may be saint-like pioneers with practical plans for applying technology to eliminate hunger or preserve the environment. Far more commonly, they’re weird people with weird ideas and practices, and are objects of ridicule.”

Read article

Conferences, Design, HCI, Media Art, Videos

Gene hunting device

March 2, 2012

The premise of Raphael Kim‘s project at Design Interactions‘ work in progress show –which closed a couple of days ago at the Royal College of Art– contained all the ingredients to intrigue me: The falling cost and increase in speed of DNA sequencing has given rise to two extreme scientific worlds: giant pharmaceutical companies who trawl the Arctic Ocean in search of potent genes that would profit them in a lucrative cancer market; and DIY biologists who try to beat the system.

The designer imagined a gene hunting device that biohackers (who usually cannot afford to ‘trawl’ the oceans) would create to collect gene samples present in the air.

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/36388272]

The device would rely on rotifers, tiny animals capable of absorbing environmental DNA, that have been genetically programmed to start glowing as soon as a target gene is spotted in their environment. The rotifers sit inside a chamber attached to the gene hunting device, and wait for the targets to come near. This kind of “LED switch” can be obtained by fusing a commercially-available fluorescent gene with a part of rotifer’s own DNA (see image on the left).

A motor spins at high speed to draw the air onto the sampler while the outer mesh of the device protects the delicate samplers and filters out large, unwanted particles.

In-line with biohacking philosophy, these actions can be done, in theory, using an open-source data and hardware available to the public. Ever since the complete DNA sequence of human has been made public, genetic maps of other organisms have been published gradually, including those of rotifers, on free online database such as GenBank. Many other pieces of biohacking equipment can either be made at home or can be purchased on ebay.

Via Regine at we make money not art.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Tools

Dattoo

February 14, 2012

The concept of the Dattoo arose in response to current trends towards increasing connectivity and technology as self-expression. The body would literally become the interface. The idea of DNA tattoos (Dattoos) is to use the body itself as a hardware and interaction platform. To achieve absolute personal identification, the hardware would capture DNA from the user’s body, enabling direct participation in the political and cultural landscape.