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playstudies – ..
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Category: playstudies

Design, HCI, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Artificial Theatre

May 17, 2016

I invited Louis-Philippe Demers for a talk at our CGI – International Seminar series.

Louis-Philippe Demers makes large-scale installations and performances. His projects can be found in theatre, opera, subway stations, art museums, science museums, music events and trade shows. Over the past two decades, he participated in more than seventy artistic and stage productions and has built more than 350 machines.

Demers was Professor of Digital Media and Exhibit Design/Scenography at the Hochschule fuer Gestaltung Karlsruhe, affiliated to the world renowned Zentrum fuer Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM, Germany). Since he joined the Interaction and Entertainment Research Centre and the newly founded School of Art, Design and Media at the Nanyang Technological University.

On the talk: Theatre has always been the test bed of illusions. The illusion of the actor replaced by a machine signifies the fantasies found in the scientific and the science-fiction communities. However, what Louis-Philippe Demers is targeting here is not the artifice but the uncomfortable communalities between the flesh and the mechanical bodies. Having these radical encounters at the liminal space bordering man and machine, it forces audiences to (re)consider their human bodies and the latest transforms in the history of their own embodied experiences.

12378_medium

Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Uncategorized

Augmented Narratives

February 10, 2016

I started my new research-project on Augmented Narratives which will involve the platforms of META2 and OCTAGON. For users, good UX-design for Augmented Reality platforms should facilitate physical and psychological immersion in the mediated experience. A holistic, multi-dimensional approach that incorporates qualitative experience and a deep understanding of the psychological aspects of optimum user experience are an imperative for such environments to be successful.

The creation of such a flexible, holistic, and enveloping environment that allows well-tuned variations and personalized adjustments, requires new forms of digital storytelling and the application of new user experience-design paradigms – based on a deep knowledge of the users’ data-scape. How can we can assess and organize these new worlds – in order to create the best experiences?

augmented-narratives-small

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Uncategorized

Tango

December 2, 2015

Had the chance to explore Google’s Tango with a team of developers. Great software and it is to hope that it can live up to its potential. The first consumer implementation will be in a package with Lenovo’s PHAB PRO later this year.
The essential aim is to give your mobile device full spatial awareness, or the ability to understand your environment and your relation to it, to get your smartphone to understand the world around it, enabling it to provide augmented reality experiences. A Project Tango device ‘sees’ the environment around it through a combination of three core functions.

First up is motion tracking, which allows the device to understand its position and orientation using a range of sensors (including accelerometer and gyroscope). Further, it involves depth perception, it is able to examine the shape of the world around you. Here it relies on Intel’s RealSense 3D camera. it helps the device to gain accurate gesture control and snappy 3D object rendering among a number of other features.

Additionally, Project Tango incorporates area learning, which means that it maps out and remembers the area around it.

12350_medium

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, HCI, playstudies, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

Magic Leap

October 26, 2015

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Magic Leap, Inc., a developer of novel human computing interfaces and software, announced in a newsletter the recent closing of its A round of venture capital. Magic Leap has now raised more than $50 million in its series seed and A rounds to develop its proprietary technology platform. Magic Leap will use the funds to advance the product development and commercialization of its proprietary human computing interface technology, known as “Cinematic RealityTM”.

At engagdet – Mariella Moon states that she can’t decipher what Magic Leap exactly is – but she argues that Magic Leap is:

a headset that superimposes digital images onto the real world. In that respect, it’s similar to Microsoft’s HoloLens, which is just slightly less mysterious (since we’ve actually seen it). But based on the things Abovitz said in his AMA at reddit, like “Our vision for AR and VR is a true replication of visual reality,” there’s a chance that it can also block the outside world entirely with virtual reality. (Update: Rachel Metz confirmed to engagdet on Twitter that it’s capable of doing full VR.)


This points out  that there’s a reason why the company is calling its technology “cinematic reality” rather than AR or VR: it works a bit differently than either of them. Standard AR and VR use stereoscopic 3D, a technique that tricks you into thinking an object is three-dimensional by showing each eye a different image and a different angle of the same object. The Oculus Rift and Samsung’s Gear VR headset are two well-known examples of this technique.

magic-leap

In his AMA Abovitz revealed that he’s not a fan of stereoscopic 3D and believes it can cause “temporary and/or permanent neurologic deficits.” So, Magic Leap uses a Lilliputian projector to shine light and images into the user’s eyes instead, the startup told Metz from MIT’s Technology Review. Your brain apparently won’t be able to detect the difference between light from the projector and light from the real world: The result is life-like digital images that show reflections like real physical objects would.

Sources:

Magic Leap

reddit

engagdet

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, playstudies, Tools

HoloLens

July 22, 2015

4 hololens

Microsoft HoloLens puts you at the center of a world that blends holograms with reality. With the ability to design and shape holograms, you’ll have a new medium to express your creativity, a more efficient way to teach and learn, and a more effective way to visualize your work and share ideas. Your digital content and creations will be more relevant when they come to life in the world around you.


Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Augmented Reality: Theory and Practice

May 4, 2015

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by Dieter Schmalstieg (Author), Tobias Hollerer (Author)

Augmented Reality (AR) is one of today’s most fascinating and future-oriented areas of computer science and technology. By overlaying computer-generated information on views of the real world, AR amplifies human perception and cognition in remarkable new ways. Do you like the virtual first-down line in football games on TV? That’s AR — and AR apps are rapidly coming to billions of smartphones, too. Working in AR requires knowledge from diverse disciplines, including computer vision, computer graphics, and human-computer interaction (HCI).

 

Augmented Reality: Principles and Practice integrates all this knowledge into one single-source reference, presenting the most significant AR work with scrupulous accuracy. Dieter Schmalstieg, a pioneer of both AR foundation and application, is drawing from his two decades of AR experience to clearly present the field. Together with mobile AR pioneer and research colleague Tobias Höllerer he addresses all aspects of the field, illuminating AR from both technical and HCI perspectives. The authors review AR’s technical foundations, including display and tracking technologies, show how AR emerges from the symbiosis of computer vision and computer graphics, introduce AR-specific visualization and 3D interaction techniques, and showcase applications from diverse industries. They conclude with an outlook on trends and emerging technologies, including practical pointers for beginning practitioners.

 

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory

Seductive Interaction Design

October 25, 2014

Unknown

What happens when you’ve built a great website or app, but no one seems to care? How do you get people to stick around long enough to see how your service might be of value? In Seductive Interaction Design, speaker and author Stephen P. Anderson takes a fresh approach to designing sites and interactions based on the stages of seduction. This beautifully designed book examines what motivates people to act.

Topics include:

  • AESTHETICS, BEAUTY, AND BEHAVIOR: Why do striking visuals grab our attention? And how do emotions affect judgment and behavior?
  • PLAYFUL SEDUCTION: How do you create playful engagements during the moment? Why are serendipity, arousal, rewards, and other delights critical to a good experience?
  • THE SUBTLE ART OF SEDUCTION: How do you put people at ease through clear and suggestive language? What are some subtle ways to influence behavior and get people to move from intent to action?
  • THE GAME OF SEDUCTION: How do you continue motivating people long after the first encounter? Are there lessons to be gained from learning theories or game design?

Principles from psychology are found throughout the book, along with dozens of examples showing how these techniques have been applied with great success. In addition, each section includes interviews with influential web and interaction designers.

Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Mobile Social and Fun: Games for Health

September 8, 2014

mobilehealth

This complimentary report authored by independent analyst Bonnie Feldman with input from MobiHealthNews covers much of the activity going on in the mobile-enabled games for health space. Mobile Social and Fun: Games for Health will appeal to readers who are both new to the subject and, thanks to the dozens of sources interviewed, those who have worked in mobile health games for years.

Download the pdf of the report here

Via: mobilehealthnews

Ambient Intelligence, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Augmented Reality: Engagement Beyond Usability

July 18, 2014

Augmented reality describes the process of using technology to overlay virtual information onto the real world to ‘augment,’ or add value, to our experience. Augmented reality applications are unique in that because they project virtual information into a user’s physical environment, they effectively blend real and virtual. They are also increasingly mobile and social. These features amplify the level of impact and persuasive power of the user experience — when done right.

All kinds of things go into success. And you might argue that usability is the key. But at the highest level, success depends on more than usability; it depends upon user experience. User experience is more than all those things combined. Of course, you still need to follow best practices for good usability because if people can’t do something they can’t be persuaded by it. But usability is no longer a key differentiator. It’s not enough.

Pamela Rutledge, Media Psychologist, Social Media and Transmedia Storytelling Strategist at the Media Psychology Research Center, gave the following presentation on these topics recently at WorldComp12 EEE.

Presentation overview:
1. Defining engagement
2. The need for a holistic evaluation of user and customer experience to achieve engagement.
3.  The role of the of the brain in achieving psychological engagement and outline the 3-brain model that you can use as a rule of thumb in your design and marketing decisions
4. Mapping brain behavior on to two theories of optimal engagement: Flow and Narrative Transportation.   Flow is optimal engagement for task-based activities.  Using story or narrative is an equally powerful way to achieve optimal engagement in narrative-based products and properties where the goal is experiential rather than task-based.
7. The similarities and differences between Flow and Narrative immersion as goals are critical to designing, developing and evaluating mobile and immersive technologies like AR.
8. Introduces the Positive Engagement Evaluation model

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, playstudies, Theory

Design For Kids

July 16, 2014

design for kids

Emotion. Ego. Impatience. Stubbornness. Characteristics like these make creating sites and apps for kids a daunting proposition. However, with a bit of knowledge, you can design experiences that help children think, play, and learn. With Design for Kids, you’ll learn how to create digital products for today’s connected generation.

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects

Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things

July 15, 2014

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In the tradition of Who Owns the Future? and The Second Machine Age, an MIT Media Lab scientist imagines how everyday objects can intuit our needs and improve our lives.

We are now standing at the precipice of the next transformative development: the Internet of Things. Soon, connected technology will be embedded in hundreds of everyday objects we already use: our cars, wallets, watches, umbrellas, even our trash cans. These objects will respond to our needs, come to know us, and learn to think on our behalf. David Rose calls these devices—which are just beginning to creep into the marketplace—Enchanted Objects.

Some believe the future will look like more of the same—more smartphones, tablets, screens embedded in every conceivable surface. Rose has a different vision: technology that atomizes, combining itself with the objects that make up the very fabric of daily living. Such technology will be woven into the background of our environment, enhancing human relationships and channeling desires for omniscience, long life, and creative expression. The enchanted objects of fairy tales and science fiction will enter real life.

Groundbreaking, timely, and provocative, Enchanted Objects is a blueprint for a better future, where efficient solutions come hand in hand with technology that delights our senses. It is essential reading for designers, technologists, entrepreneurs, business leaders, and anyone who wishes to understand the future and stay relevant in the Internet of Things.

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Virtual World Design

virtual-world-design

Written by an award-winning designer with 20 years of experience designing virtual environments for television and online communities, Virtual World Design explores the intertwining disciplines of 2D graphics, 3D models, lighting, sound, and storytelling. It illustrates how these disciplines come together by design in the creation of an accessible virtual environment for teaching, research, and entertainment. The book gives anyone the tools and techniques to design virtual environments that support their message and are accessible by all.

With 200 illustrations and 12 step-by-step projects, the book delivers hours of creative challenges for people working in public virtual worlds or on private grids. Using the modular components available for download on the author’s website, readers learn by building such things as a virtual classroom, an “all-access” terrain, and a sound-based game.

This book can be the foundation for class work in distance learning, simulation, and other learning technologies that use virtual environments. It shows both novices and advanced users how 3D composition, color, lighting, and sound design are used in the creation of an immersive virtual environment.

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Transmedia Storytelling

A Game Design Vocabulary

March 12, 2014

game vocabulary

Why aren’t videogames getting better? Why does it feel like we’re playing the same games, over and over again? Why aren’t games helping us transform our lives, like great music, books, and movies do?

The problem is language. We still don’t know how to talk about game design. We can’t share our visions. We forget what works (and doesn’t). We don’t learn from history. It’s too hard to improve.

The breakthrough starts here. A Game Design Vocabulary gives us the complete game design framework we desperately need—whether we create games, study them, review them, or build businesses on them.

Craft amazing experiences. Anna Anthropy and Naomi Clark share foundational principles, examples, and exercises that help you create great player experiences…complement intuition with design discipline…and craft games that succeed brilliantly on every level.

  • Liberate yourself from stale clichés and genres
  • Tell great stories: go way beyond cutscenes and text dumps
  • Control the crucial relationships between game “verbs” and “objects”
  • Wield the full power of development, conflict, climax, and resolution
  • Shape scenes, pacing, and player choices
  • Deepen context via art, animation, music, and sound
  • Help players discover, understand, engage, and “talk back” to you
  • Effectively use resistance and difficulty: the “push and pull” of games
  • Design holistically: integrate visuals, audio, and controls
  • Communicate a design vision everyone can understand
Augmented Reality, Conferences, Design, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

The Leviathan Project

January 10, 2014

On January 6th 2012, at the Intel Pre-Conference Keynote at CES in Las Vegas – for the first time in public – Intel and USC World Building Media Lab unveiled the Leviathan – a giant Whale that swims above an audience of 5000, all reaching out to touch the creature flying overhead.

From the presentation:

We bring you an experiment in storytelling that shatters the membrane between audience and content. The Leviathan Project creates an immersive world in which audiences can engage, explore and physically experience virtual environments and fantastic characters.

We are playtesting a future where the design of a world precedes the telling of a story, and the richly detailed world becomes a container for countless narratives.

What Is 5D?

5D Institute is a cutting edge USC non-profit Organized Research Unit dedicated to the dissemination, education, and appreciation of the future of narrative media through World Building.

World Building designates a narrative practice in which the design of a world precedes the telling of a story; the richly detailed world becomes a container for narrative, producing stories that emerge logically and organically from its well-designed core.

World Building is founded on three beliefs, namely that storytelling is the most powerful system for the advancement of human capability due to its ability to allow the human imagination to precede the realization of thought; that all stories emerge logically and intuitively from the worlds that create them; and that new technologies powerfully enable us to sculpt the imagination into existence.

5D Institute is the world’s leading World Building collective. Our network of preeminent World Builders transcends borders and boundaries in film, animation, fashion, gaming, theatre, television, music, architecture, science, interactive media and more.

Through the newly cemented partnership with USC School of Cinematic Arts, 5D Institute is evolving into an unmatched connector between the next generation of young and undiscovered creators traversing the bleeding edge of innovation and companies who want to be at the frontlines of the new media landscape.

Since Oct 2008, we have come together at 5D’s distributed events to engage in a disruptive interrogation of our fractured disciplines, to create best practices and a new shared language across narrative media.

‘The neural sparking between left brain and right brain is at the core of 5D – we are moving into a landscape where art and science, design and engineering are inseparable. At their intersection lies the new creative laboratory for the future of our narrative practices.’

– Alex McDowell, 5D Institute Director

For more information:  5dinstitute.org/

Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Computer Systems Experiences of Users with and Without Disabilities: An Evaluation Guide for Professionals

November 27, 2013

computersystems users

This book provides the necessary tools for the evaluation of the interaction between the user who is disabled and the computer system that was designed to assist that person. It creates an evaluation process able to assess the user’s satisfaction with a developed system. It takes into account all of the individuals involved in the evaluation process. It presents a new theoretical perspective in the human computer interaction evaluation of disabled persons.

Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Theory

Computers As Theatre, 2nd Edition

October 7, 2013

computer theatre

Brenda Laurel’s Computers as Theatre revolutionized the field of human-computer interaction, offering ideas that inspired generations of interface and interaction designers — and continue to inspire them. Laurel’s insight was that effective interface design, like effective drama, must engage the user directly in an experience involving both thought and emotion. Her practical conclusion was that a user’s enjoyment must be a paramount design consideration, and this demands a deep awareness of dramatic theory and technique, both ancient and modern. Now, two decades later, Laurel has revised and revamped her classic, reflecting all that’s happened, all she’s learned, and emerging technologies that will transform human-computer interaction yet again. Beginning with a clear analysis of classical drama theory, Laurel explores new territory through the lens of dramatic structure and purpose.

This new edition, directed to a far wider audience, is written more simply and elegantly, packed with new examples, and replete with exciting and important new ideas. Utterly unique among books on interface/interaction design, Computers as Theatre, Second Edition: * Draws lessons from sources ranging from massively multiplayer online games and systems, social networks, and mobile devices with embedded sensors * Analyzes the most relevant vectors in the historical development of computer technology and interaction design since the late 20th Century * Integrates values-driven design as a key principle (linking the “sacred civic duty” of ancient Greek theatre to the modern civic function of design) * Integrates key ideas about virtual reality * Reflects important work by other pioneers such as Michael Mateas, Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Mary Flanagan and Henry Jenkins * Covers new frontiers including augmented reality, distributed and participatory sensing, interactive public installations and venues, and design for emergence Once more, Brenda Laurel will help you see the connection between humans and computers.

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

The Art of Immersion

September 4, 2013

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The Art of Immersion – a highly praised book – author Frank Rose explains his understanding of storytelling, and what it means for us all:

Some quotes from the webpage:

 What we’re witnessing is the emergence of a new form of narrative that’s native to the In­ternet. Told through many media at once in a nonlinear fashion, these new narratives en­cour­age us not merely to watch but to par­ticipate, often engaging us in the same way that games do. This is “deep media”: stories that are not just entertaining but immersive, that take you deep­er than an hour-long TV drama or a two-hour movie or a 30-second spot will permit.

From this point forward, storytellers of every persuasion will need to function in a world in which distinctions that were clear throughout the industrial age are be­coming in­creasingly blurred:

  • The blurring of author and audience: Whose story is it?
  • The blurring of story and game: How do you engage with it?
  • The blurring of entertainment and marketing: What function does it serve?
  • The blurring of fiction and reality: Where does one end and the other begin?

In THE ART OF IMMERSIONWired correspondent Frank Rose describes why this is happening to us.

“Highly readable, deeply engaging . . . accessible and urgent.”

—Henry Jenkins, author of Convergence Culture

The Art of Immersion is a must read for all filmmakers.”

—Ted Hope, producer of 21 Grams and The Laramie Project

 

More reviews:


“The Web lets us dive deeper than ever before, though into what is up to us. A new avant-garde is taking the plunge – not underground, but online. For those of us lagging behind, wading rather than diving into art’s new cyber-sphere, Frank Rose makes an excellent guide.” The Atlantic

 

★ “Like Marshall McLuhan’s groundbreaking 1964 book, Understanding Media, this engrossing study of how new media is reshaping the entertainment, advertising, and communication industries is an essential read.” —Library Journal

 

“Fascinating . . . [Frank Rose] talks about how the Internet is changing the way we create and consume narrative. He notes that media innovations, such as radio or television, take a few decades before we learn how to best utilize them. TV started out as live broadcasts and ended up creating a new form of narrative. The Internet started out as a digital repository for print journalism, but is now creating a new form of engagement. ‘We are ceasing to be consumers of mass media,’ says Rose, ‘we are becoming participants in social media—a far more fluid environment in which we simultaneously act as producers, consumers, curators, and commentators, sharing our thoughts and perceptions with people we know and people we don’t.'”
—Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post

 

“The worldwide web has already begun to have an influence on imaginative ex­pres­sion. The Internet, as Frank Rose writes in The Art of Immersion, ‘is the first me­dium that can act like all media. It can be text, or audio, or video, or all of the above. . . .’ According to Rose, ‘a new type of narrative is emerging – one that’s told through many media at once in a way that’s nonlinear, that’s participatory and often game-like, and that’s designed above all to be immersive. This is deep media.'”
Robert McCrum, The Observer

 

“Compelling . . . The era of the couch potato, argues Rose, is at an end. . . . From Star Wars to Lost (‘television for the hive mind’), it is the immersive, ‘fractal-like com­plexity’ of storytelling that turns on digital audiences and sends them online to extend the fantasy via wikis, Twitter and blogs.” —P.D. Smith, The Guardian

 

“It’s a grand trip, taking in everything from Charles Dickens to Super Mario and Avatar. The book is meticulously researched, persuasively constructed and benefits from an impressive level of access.” New Scientist

 

 

“Tremendously lively and clever . . . An intelligent guide to how technologies have created new opportunities for narrative.” —Scotland on Sunday

 

“Clear, concise and scrupulously fact-checked . . . For anyone even remotely in­terested in a how-we-got-here-and-where-we’re-going guide to interactive, socially-networked entertainment, it’s an essential read.” —David Hughes, Empire

 

“As the American Frank Rose argues in his book The Art of Immersion, TV pro­grammes such as the internationally successful drama Lost have spread out from their original shape, partly . . . because scriptwriters have become influenced by games culture.” —BBC World Service

 

“An exciting book which shows how the Internet is changing the world of entertainment. . . . Frank Rose describes an ongoing artistic revolution that breaks with traditional, linear narrative and gives us a new understanding of reality.”
TF1 News

 

“An inquiry into the heart of the culture industry. . . . [The Art of Immersion] reflects on the unstable borders of fiction—before and after the digital revolution—and even on the definition of a work of art.” —Les Inrockuptibles

 


“With this book, Rose seeks to convey the message that we are only at the beginning of a radical anthropological shift. The revolution brought about by the Internet is altering reality, and this transformed world is inventing its own language and its own codes to portray itself.” —Libération

 

“A new media bible.” la Repubblica

 

“Television has not disappeared, nor will it. But content production is changing pro­foundly. The networked computer has facilitated the rise of deep media, that is, me­dia which take into account the exhaustion of the unidirectional broadcast model of television, pointing directly to the involvement of the audience as generators of con­tent. It is to these deep media that the book is dedicated.”
Benedetto Vecchi, il Manifesto

 

“A comprehensive overview of the evolution of the way we create culture and enter­tainment.” —la Stampa

 

“Captivating . . . We’re in the midst of a fascinating – and delirious, often over­whelming – cultural moment, one that Rose, with his important new book, astutely helps us to understand.” —Holly Willis, KCET-TV Los Angeles

 

"

“An essential overview . . . Applications in the academic world are clear (it is already on the syllabi for classes at USC and Columbia), but it also constitutes a prerequisite for those wishing to enter Hollywood, and marketers or PR professionals wishing to engage an increasingly fragmented audience.”
International Journal of Advertising

 

“In his terrific new book, The Art of Immersion, [Frank Rose] captures the need for new thinking. . . . We need tools to tell new stories for new times, and our stories right now reflect our culture: they’re fragmented, dispersed, remixed and remade. They’re networked and participatory and nonlinear.” —Filmmaker

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Designing Games: A Guide to Engineering Experiences

August 14, 2013

.designing games

How do video games resonate with players to become worldwide hits? This practical book shows you how the right combination of story elements, psychology, and game theory can generate emotionally charged experiences that take players beyond mindless entertainment. Author and experienced game designer Tynan Sylvester takes you through everything from narrative to motivation, using down-to-earth advice and real-world examples. Great games affect people in ways that stories alone cannot, and there are lots of possibilities yet to discover.

This book is a light along that path. Learn how to make practical design decisions and weigh trade offs Establish a planning horizon and test your design through iteration Find low-cost, high-reward solutions for making your game accessible yet deep Understand methods for balancing levels, scheduling rewards, and designing rich multilayer interactions Provide motivation, and discover how to make the game just difficult enough

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools

Wearable devices

November 20, 2012

Consumers are adopting technology faster than ever: Witness the rapid mainstreaming of devices such as the Apple iPad and Microsoft Kinect for Xbox 360. As some argue wearable devices will be next. Wearable devices, or “wearables” for short, have enormous potential for uses in health and fitness, navigation, social networking, commerce, and media.

In a new report, Forrester argues that wearables will move mainstream once they get serious investment from the “big five” platforms — Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook — and their developer communities.

A blog post by the research company lists the key take-aways.

> More reflections by The New York Times | TechCrunch

Meanwhile, interaction-design.org has published an extensive chapter on wearable computing, in collaboration with Steven Mann, a tenured professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto.

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

Augmented Reality: An Emerging Technologies Guide to AR

November 14, 2012

Unknown

With the explosive growth in mobile phone usage and rapid rise in search engine technologies over the last decade, augmented reality (AR) is poised to be one of this decade’s most disruptive technologies, as the information that is constantly flowing around us is brought into view, in real-time, through augmented reality. In this cutting-edge book, the authors outline and discuss never-before-published information about augmented reality and its capabilities. With coverage of mobile, desktop, developers, security, challenges, and gaming, this book gives you a comprehensive understanding of what augmented reality is, what it can do, what is in store for the future and most importantly: how to benefit from using AR in our lives and careers.

  • Educates readers how best to use augmented reality regarless of industry
  • Provides an in-depth understanding of AR and ideas ranging from new business applications to new crime fighting methods
  • Includes actual examples and case studies from both private and government applications
Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Tools

Superbetter – will this app make you better?

November 7, 2012

SuperBetter, is an online social game designed to build personal resilience in the face of a serious challenge — like an illness or injury, anxiety or depression. SuperBetter can also be used to make a major health change, like losing weight, quitting smoking, or eating better. Players are challenged to build up their core strengths of physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. SuperBetter helps you achieve your health goals — or recover from an illness or injury — by increasing your personal resilience. Resilience means staying curious, optimistic and motivated even in the face of the toughest challenges.

The creators of the game, SuperBetter Labs, initiated by Gamedesigner Jane McGonical apply technology and design to empower individuals and communities to lead “epic lives.” The lab focuses on creating games that are powered by strong social relationships, positive emotion, and a real sense of purpose. By bringing together science and wisdom with innovative technology and design, SuperBetter Labs explores how we can flourish best and achieve our full human potential — individually, and collectively.

SUPERBETTERinsert                                                                                                            Source: Superbetter

By creating a fully customizable experience backed up by strong scientific principles, SuperBetter allows any player to gain an experience and chase “epic wins”. Players are encouraged to find their “power ups”, small activities that boost their personal well-being while fighting off “bad guys”, activities and emotions that bring them down. In addition, various goal setting challenges and the ability to draw friends in, allows SuperBetter to create an engaging gaming experience with scientific data that is proven to encourage happiness and personal growth.

The creators point out that SuperBetter isn’t a game – “it’s just an awesome tool created by game designers who take the best of games and apply it to your real life so you can get stronger, happier, and healthier”. They state:

►► Why play SuperBetter?

Because you want to:
• Feel stronger every day
• Change what isn’t working
• Tackle a tough challenge
• Reach your goals
• Get more support, and support others
• Have more fun and live with meaning

►► Key Features

• Tackle real-life challenges with customized Quests
• Boost your health and mood with Power-Ups
• Identify Bad Guys that are holding you back
• Join forces with your friends and Allies
• Get advice from over 25 expert-created Power Packs
• Learn the cutting-edge science behind making changes that work

►► SuperBetter is Strength

SuperBetter builds personal resilience: the ability to stay strong, motivated, and optimistic even in the face of a tough challenge.

►► SuperBetter is Feeling Happier and Healthier

Research shows that resilience has a powerful effect on health by boosting physical and emotional well-being.

►► SuperBetter is Smart

Choose from over 25 Power Packs created by experts to help you with your challenges and goals, or design your own adventure for any area of life where you want to get stronger or feel better.

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SuperBetter was invented by game designers and created with guidance from doctors, psychologists, scientists, and medical researchers. The investigators of a clinical trial believe that SuperBetter, and positive play games like it, are promising novel interventions that could make a positive difference in the ability of our patients to successfully transition to self care after discharge from therapeutic care.

Press:  The SuperBetter Press page

Contact:  The SuperBetter Contact page

Scientific background: Superbetter-blog

Via: Games for Change

Books, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory

Game Design Secrets

October 22, 2012

game secrets

Design great Facebook, iOS, and Web games and learn from the experts what makes a game a hit!

This invaluable resource shows how to put into action the proven design and marketing techniques from the industry’s best game designers, who all started on a small scale. The book walks novice and experienced game designers through the step-by-step process of conceptualizing, designing, launching, and managing a winning game on platforms including Facebook, iOS, and the Web.

The book is filled with examples that highlight key design features, explain how to market your game, and illustrate how to turn your design into a money-making venture.

Provides an overview of the most popular game platforms and shows how to design games for each.

Contains the basic principles of game design that will help promote growth and potential to generate revenue Includes interviews with top independent game developers who reveal their success secrets.

Offers an analysis of future trends that can open (or close) opportunities for game designers.

Game Design Secrets provides aspiring game designers a process for planning, designing, marketing, and ultimately making money from new games.

Ambient Intelligence, Conferences, Design, Internet of Things, playstudies, Theory

Gamification World Asia Pacific 2012 Singapore

October 12, 2012

gamification_world_asia
Gamification World Asia Pacific 2012 summit is the ONLY event in Asia Pacific dedicated to exploring how gamification will transform your organization’s marketing and branding strategies, customer and employee engagement campaigns and enterprise performances, supported by case studies. Taking place in Singapore 28th – 29th November 2012.

Download the brochure

Ambient Intelligence, Conferences, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, people, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Videos

NESTA’s – Digital you event

September 8, 2012

Catch up on all the insights from our NESTA’s Digital You-Event which looked at telepresence and the psychology of electronic communications. This event explored how robotics and new collaboration tools can emulate being there in person, and how we can make better use of email and video conferencing without ‘information overload’

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/24513233]
Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Immersive experiences with diegetic interfaces

September 3, 2012

Imon Deshmukh believes  that interfaces can be more closely integrated with the environment in which they operate. In an article on the Cooper blog, he shares some of what he heas learned from the universe of video games and how it might be applicable to other kinds of designed experiences.

  • “A key area of the problem lies in how we’re presented and interact with complex information diegetically, that is, interfaces that actually exist within the game world itself.” […]
  • Technology seems to be finally overcoming the restrictions that have kept diegetic interfaces limited to gimmickry until now. While still in its infancy, the push to duplicate more of our natural interactions with our environment seems to be gaining momentum as evidenced by new products using non-traditional interaction models. Most of them, like the popular Nintendo Wii, have yet to deal with immersion in terms of interfaces. On the other hand, Microsoft’s, whose controller-free gaming technology Kinect is about to enter the market, has stated its intention to eliminate what it calls the “barrier” between the player and the game world.”

Read article

Books, Design, HCI, playstudies, Theory

Playful Design: Creating Game Experiences in Everyday Interfaces

August 20, 2012

Unknown-1

Game design is a sibling discipline to software and Web design, but they’re siblings that grew up in different houses. They have much more in common than their perceived distinction typically suggests, and user experience practitioners can realize enormous benefit by exploiting the solutions that games have found to the real problems of design. This book will show you how.

Buy at Amazon

Books, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects

Ethnographies of the Videogame

August 5, 2012
Ethnographies of the Videogame: Gender, Narrative and Praxis
by Helen Thornham, City University London, UK
Ethnographies of the Videogame
Ashgate, July 2011, 218 pages
[Amazon UK link]
Ethnographies of the Videogame  uses the medium of the videogame to explore wider significant sociological issues around new media, interaction, identity, performance, memory and mediation. Addressing questions of how we interpret, mediate and use media texts, particularly in the face of claims about the power of new media to continuously shift the parameters of lived experience, gaming is employed as a ‘tool’ through which we can understand the gendered and socio-culturally constructed phenomenon of our everyday engagement with media.

The book is particularly concerned with issues of agency and power, identifying strong correlations between perceptions of gaming and actual gaming practices, as well as the reinforcement, through gaming, of established (gendered, sexed, and classed) power relationships within households. As such, it reveals the manner in which existing relations re-emerge through engagement with new technology.

Offering an empirically grounded understanding of what goes on when we mediate technology and media in our everyday lives Ethnographies of the Videogame is more than a timely intervention into game studies. It provides pertinent and reflexive commentary on the relationship between text and audience, highlighting the relationships of gender and power in gaming practice. As such, it will appeal to scholars interested in media and new media, gender and class, and the sociology of leisure.

Helen Thornham is Lecturer in Sociology and Media at City University, London, UK

Books, Design, HCI, playstudies, Transmedia Storytelling

Storytelling for User Experience: Crafting Stories for Better Design

June 10, 2012

storytelling user experience

Authors: Whitney Quesenbery, Kevin Brooks

We all use stories to communicate, explore, persuade, and inspire. In user experience, stories help us to understand our users, learn about their goals, explain our research, and demonstrate our design ideas. In this book, Quesenbery and Brooks teach you how to craft and tell your own unique stories to improve your designs.
Testimonials:
“Stories facilitate a level of communication that is as close to telepathy as you can get. Kevin and Whitney guide you to use storytelling in `how to’ scenarios so smoothly that you may never realize how far you leapfrogged ahead and never know the mistakes you didn’t make because of this book. It’s that good.”
—Annette Simmons, author of The Story Factor
“A very practical, readable survey of ways to use
Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Smart surfaces

June 9, 2012

Whether luminous wallpaper, curtains that produce electricity, or self-cleaning windowpanes, more than ever before innovations in surface technologies are influencing and will continue to revolutionize the use of materials in architecture, interior design, and design.

The new smart surfaces expand considerably design possibilities for architects and designers. Their use leads to new typologies and concepts that can also do justice to changes in expectations for buildings and design.

The impression we have of a building or an object is increasingly determined by its surface qualities. Designers are thus confronted anew with the question of “appropriate materials” when dealing with smart surfaces.

Smart Surfaces brings these design fields into the creative focus of planners and designers, and emphasizes concrete possibilities for applications. Planning fundamentals, including cost-benefit analyses, and questions related to building, including details of constructions, are presented in a clear and intelligible way. The various materials are introduced and their potentials assessed. Smart Surfaces not only offers a good overview of the themes but also provides inspiration for making use of these new surfaces.

A book for everyone who wishes to be inspired by the possibilities for innovative surface technologies.

Book at Amazon.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools

The NETLab Toolkit

June 4, 2012

The NETLab Toolkit is a system for integrating tangible interaction and media. Designed for project sketching and production, the toolkit enables novices and experts to integrate hardware, media and interactive behaviors for products, installations, and research.

This free collection of software makes it easy integrate all kinds of media with microcontrollers like the Arduino. Using a simple drag-and-drop interface, you can create interactive projects that combine sensors, video, text, graphics, sound, lighting, motors and more. These projects can be created quickly, without programming, using the smart widgets included with the Toolkit.


The NETLab Toolkit is a project of Philip van Allen and the New Ecology of Things Lab in the Media Design Program at Art Center College of Design. Ewan Branda is the developer of the NETLab Toolkit Hub.

Books, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human

April 20, 2012

storytelling animal

Humans live in landscapes of make-believe: we spin fantasies, we devour novels, films, and plays and even our sporting events and criminal trials unfold as narratives. Yet the world of story has long remained an undiscovered and unmapped country. It’s easy to say that humans are “wired” for story, but “why”?

In this delightful and original book, Jonathan Gottschall offers the first unified theory of storytelling. He argues that stories are a way of rehearsing life’s complex social problems: Our penchant for story has evolved, like other behaviors, to enhance our survival, and, crucially, that of our social group. Gottschall explores the deep pattern in children’s make-believe, and what that reveals about story’s prehistoric origins. We are master shapers of story. “The Storytelling Animal “finally reveals how stories shape “us.”

Ambient Intelligence, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects

The smart city is you

Usman Haque, founder of Pachube.com and director at Haque Design + Research and CEO of Connected Environments, published a post at Wired UK. He argues current Smart Cities initiatives’ strategies focus strongly on the city as a single entity, rather than the people.

  • “Initiatives are looking for a one-size fits all, top-down strategic approach to sustainability, citizen well-being and economic development. In short, their strategies focus on the city as a single entity, rather than the people — citizens — that bring it to life.
  • Any adequate model for the smart city must focus on the smartness of its citizens and encourage the processes that make cities important: those that sustain very different — sometimes conflicting — activities. Cities are, by definition, engines of diversity so focusing solely on streamlining utilities, transport, construction and unseen government processes can be massively counter-productive, in much the same way that the 1960s idealistic fondness for social-housing tower block economic efficiency was found, ultimately, to be socially and culturally unsustainable.
  • We, citizens, create and recreate our cities with every step we take, every conversation we have, every nod to a neighbour, every space we inhabit, every structure we erect, every transaction we make. A smart city should help us increase these serendipitous connections. It should actively and consciously enable us to contribute to data-making (rather than being mere consumers of it), and encourage us to make far better use of data that’s already around us.
  • Any adequate model for the smart city must focus on the smartness of its citizens and encourage the processes that make cities important: those that sustain very different — sometimes conflicting — activities. Cities are, by definition, engines of diversity so focusing solely on streamlining utilities, transport, construction and unseen government processes can be massively counter-productive, in much the same way that the 1960s idealistic fondness for social-housing tower block economic efficiency was found, ultimately, to be socially and culturally unsustainable.
  • We, citizens, create and recreate our cities with every step we take, every conversation we have, every nod to a neighbour, every space we inhabit, every structure we erect, every transaction we make. A smart city should help us increase these serendipitous connections. It should actively and consciously enable us to contribute to data-making (rather than being mere consumers of it), and encourage us to make far better use of data that’s already around us.”


Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Media Art, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies

The Extreme Environment Love Hotel: Carboniferous Room

February 10, 2012

Image courtesy Ai Hasegawa and Joseph Popper

Japanese love hotels go out of their way to satisfy the most outlandish fetish: some rooms offer the feeling of being inside a subway carriage, a class room, or a Hello Kitty SM room, others locks you into an alien abduction nightmare (/dream).

Ai Hasegawa, second year student in Design Interactions at the Royal College of Art in London, proposes to close loving couples into an even more extraordinary fantasy.

Our bodies would survive if we were propelled back to the Carboniferous period but they would need to adapt if we’d stay over long periods of time. It is estimated that during that time, the peak oxygen content of the atmosphere was as high as 35%, compared to 21% today. This oxygen level resulted in insect and amphibian gigantism–creatures whose size is constrained by respiratory systems that are limited in their ability to diffuse oxygen. For example, the ancestor of the dragonfly, the Meganeura, grew up to seventy-five centimeters due to the huge concentration of oxygen in the air.

Life on Jupiter doesn’t sound very pleasant for us either. The atmospheric environment of the largest planet within the Solar System is one of strong gravity, high pressure, strong winds, and extremely cold temperatures.

How might our bodies change, struggle or even adapt with varying conditions around us?

 

Image courtesy Ai Hasegawa and Joseph Popper

The first of Ai Hasegawa’s Extreme Environment Love Hotel room, the carboniferous one, is currently on view at the work in progress show of the Royal College of Art. The prototypes show how couples would have to carry a suitcase containing higher levels of oxygen that recreate the atmosphere of the Carboniferous period, they would also be surrounded by plants similar to the ones that proliferated in the warm and humid climate: large trees covered with bark and huge ferns growing in swamps.

The designer’s work is of course a bit eccentric but it also propose to reflect on how making love inside an Extreme Environments Love Hotel room might give rise to new evolutions and mutations of the human body and sex and give it a brand new role away from our biologically-programmed needs and inclinations.

3D sketch of the Jupiter room. Image courtesy Ai Hasegawa

Customer might need to wear a harness to support the weight, they might also need to wear a bone protector, just in case. You have to be careful with the position you chose. If you want to adopt a ‘woman on top’ position, then your body might be too heavy to climb up. Besides, the man’s hipbone might break under the weight. But if you stay for a week or a month, maybe after a while your body will adapt and become more masculine.

In a Hotel room, you also need to have a toilet and a shower. The water in the Jupiter room would fall 2.35 times faster than usual. One day lasts only 9 hours and 55 min in this room.

If you want, you might probably be able to make a baby under the hyper gravity.

Via Regine at We make money not art

 

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory

Interview: Julian Bleecker

December 24, 2011

An interview of Julian Bleecker by Steven Portigal about the near future, design fiction and storytelling.

Julian Bleecker is a designer, technologist and researcher in the Advanced Projects studio at Nokia Design in Los Angeles and the Near Future Laboratory where he investigates emerging social practices around new networked interaction rituals. His focus is on hands-on design and prototyping as a way to raise questions about commonly held assumptions about digital media and digital devices so as to explore possibilities for innovation. He lectures and leads workshops on the intersections of art, design, technology and the near-future possibilities for new social-technical interaction rituals.

Read interview

Conferences, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Videos

Gaming for the better good

November 7, 2011
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22pw_sO3O9g#t=1m43s] Discussion at the 2011 GSB Entrepreneurship Conference:

We spend over three billion hours a week playing online games. Games are engaging; they provide us with a sense of satisfaction and a chance to be part of something bigger than ourselves. What would happen if we applied these same dynamics to real world challenges? Learn how game thinking can be used to engage and empower participants to solve large-scale business, social, and educational challenges.

Ambient Intelligence, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies

Why Microsoft’s vision of the future is D.O.A.

October 28, 2011

A viral clip produced by Microsoft is–like almost every video on this subject–amazingly polished. It’s also inane and completely lifeless, says FastCo Design.

“Futuristic interfaces are supposed to solve problems and make life easier. What good are they–besides being eye candy–if the future around them is picture-perfect already? The Microsoft video takes that conceit of perfection and carries it so far that the concepts begin to look ridiculous: You can pick out all kinds of clever touches, such as the way the images on a computer screen can be dragged off screen to become holograms–and then can be controlled with gestures. But by that point, we’re way off in future land, where none of these clever touches feel rooted in life. They don’t address problems we understand.”

Link to article and video

Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies

Learning from Games

September 2, 2011

Joe Lamantia, an Amsterdam based experience architect, discussed the role of emotion in game design.In his article, Lamantia refers to Nicole Lazzaro’s work, a leading games researcher and design consultant.

“Emotion is one of the most powerful elements of an experience, and also the most difficult to design. Yet games regularly inspire intense emotions, drawing players into the experience they offer, and making these experiences enjoyable and memorable.

With the best games, these feelings endure long after we finish playing. Plainly, interaction designers who want to better understand how to inspire emotions could learn a lot from games.”

Full story

Books, Design, playstudies, Smart Objects

Playreport by IKEA

August 5, 2011

Playreportis a global research project on children, families and play, initiated by IKEA.

The company conducted 11,000 interviews in 25 countries, and spoke to 8,000 parents and 3,000 children aged 7-12. It is therefore, according to IKEA, the largest global research project ever conducted on parenting, children and the state of play around the world.

The Playreport lives on on Ikea’s Facebook page, which invites experts and parents around the globe to join in the conversation in order to increase awareness and discussion about the value of play for kids.

Download the international summary of the Playreport (pdf)

(Via Creativity Online)

 

Books, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory

A new culture of learning

July 5, 2011

A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change
by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown
Publisher: CreateSpace – January, 2011)
Paperback, 140 pages
(Amazon link)
  • The 21st century is a world in constant change. In A New Culture of Learning, Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown pursue an understanding of how the forces of change, and emerging waves of interest associated with these forces, inspire and invite us to imagine a future of learning that is as powerful as it is optimistic. Their understanding of what constitutes “a new culture of learning” is based on several basic assumptions about the world and how learning occurs:
  • The world is changing faster than ever and our skill sets have a shorter life
  • Understanding play is critical to understanding learning
  • The world is getting more connected that ever before – can that be a resource?
  • In this connected world, mentorship takes on new importance and meaning
  • Challenges we face are multi-faceted requiring systems thinking & socio-technical sensibilities
  • Skills are important but so are mind sets and dispositions
  • Innovation is more important than ever – but turns on our ability to cultivate imagination
  • A new culture of learning needs to leverage social & technical infrastructures in new ways
  • Play is the basis for cultivating imagination and innovation
  • By exploring play, innovation, and the cultivation of the imagination as cornerstones of learning, the authors create a vision of learning for the future that is achievable, scalable and one that grows along with the technology that fosters it and the people who engage with it. The result is a new form of culture in which knowledge is seen as fluid and evolving, the personal is both enhanced and refined in relation to the collective, and the ability to manage, negotiate and participate in the world is governed by the play of the imagination.
  • Typically, when we think of culture, we think of an existing, stable entity that changes and evolves over long periods of time. In A New Culture of Learning, Thomas and Brown explore a second sense of culture, one that responds to its surroundings organically. It not only adapts, it integrates change into its process as one of its environmental variables.

The book website contains some of the authors’ talks, including one by John Seely Brown on “Tinkering as a Mode of Knowledge Production”.

Persuasive Technologies, playstudies

Serious Play: the business of social currency

June 22, 2011

 

As someone who has taken a deep dive in several social networks (he joined Twitter in 2007) and observes both the gaming and currency aspects of them, David Armano believes these dynamics will influence the business world as it becomes more connected. In his blog David Armano writes:

Empire Avenue highlights a pervasive trend that will likely influence the business world in the long term. Like many other platforms, including popular networks such as Facebook, Empire Avenue caters to human psychological factors and uses game techniques to reward participation and encourage a participant to willingly “give up” what is truly valuable in business–data. So why would someone want to give up data? Facebook knows the answer to this question: social currency.

Social currency is shared information that encourages further social encounters. It’s not a new concept, but the social web increases its prevalence. In the web-based collaboration software platform called Rypple, a simple act of thanking someone on a team and using a badge as a way to show your gratitude is a form of social currency. A platform called Badgeville promises to add virtual rewards to your digital media property through leaderboards and virtual “badges” that act as reinforcements to reward certain behaviors and encourage others. As someone who has taken a deep dive in several social networks (I joined Twitter in 2007) and observes both the gaming and currency aspects of them, I do believe these dynamics will influence the business world as it becomes more connected. In this “social reward” economy, there are a few things you may want to consider.

Read article

Ambient Intelligence, Internet of Things, playstudies, Theory

The good life

June 19, 2011


Artefact Design Director, August de los Reyes and user-researcher, Dave McColgin, contributed to the current issue of Arcade magazine, the magazine for architecture and design in the Northwest, released last week.  Addressing the topic of the issue’s theme “The Good Life,” where Ray Gasetil challenges a range of designers, thinkers and activists to respond to this proposal: “To get to the sustainable future we want, we have to stop and remember that our goal can’t just be to live green, it also has to be to live well.”

Dave McColgin and August de los Reyes conducted interviews from two distinct perspectives on the same topic: one from Jessica Geenan, who works for Puget Sound Energy, and the other from Jenny Kam, a freelance designer whose master’s thesis focused on hedonism.  They were both asked an identical set of questions to reveal the facets of the same topic from two independent points of view.

“We should be leading the way and designing with substance, starting by refining and updating our methods to adapt to our changing environment. Sustainability used to be an unquestioned and inherent part ofdesign, nothing like the recent wave of green veneers smacked onto products.  We must design for context and consider the value of our work. Just because you can design something new doesn’t mean it’s an improvement, and designers need to be critical of such practices.” says Kam.

Understanding our perceptions of the good life contributes to Artefact’s on-going discussion of 21st Century Design.

You can read the whole article here.

Media Art, playstudies, Theory

Opening Reading Frames

June 7, 2011


Opening Reading Frames (by Paulo Maria Rodrigues)

is a meta-project that aims to develop collective forms of creation/improvisation in multiuser interactive spaces. It builds up from knowledge that has been acquired in projects such as Walking on Earth or CaDaReMi and aims to expand those boundaries and create new challenges that will materialise the idea of interactive spaces as agents of developing relationships between individuals and catalysers of interpersonal communication through sensorial artistic experiences. The designation Opening Reading Frames, besides its immediate meaning, is also a clear quotation of a concept from molecular biology and means, in this context, the capacity to produce different outputs according to the way different agents interact on a code or topology. It is envisaged that different concretisations of ORF will be as far apart as the visualisation/sonification of online information about the human genome (Walking on the Human Genome), the construction of poetic narratives (Story Tailor), the musical exploration of audio information (SurfIN), the construction vocal elements resulting from the hybridisation between music and sound poetry (Soneme) or the construction  of multitrack/multiusers sequencers. The common idea between these possibilities is the fact that the visual and sound output depends on the relationships that the agents (the users) develop between themselves, which is to say that the artist product emerges as a consequence of the interaction between the users.

at e-learning café _ Oporto University _ June 16,17 _10h to 13h

Conferences, Design, Internet of Things, Media Art, playstudies, Theory

This is playful 2011

June 6, 2011

Playful is a one-day event all about games and play — in all their manifestations, throughout the contemporary media landscape. It’s a conference for architects, artists, designers, developers, geeks, gurus, gamers, tinkerers, thinkerers, bloggers, joggers, and philosophers.

A conference about play, games & innovation – 21 Oct, 2011 – Conway Hall, London

 

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, playstudies, Smart Objects

Hybrids: The social web in the physical world

June 4, 2011

The Touch project has a new exhibition in collaboration with the Record project at the Oslo School of Architecture & Design.

In recent years we have witnessed the growth of a new breed of consumer products and services that are a hybrid of tangible atoms and online bits. This exhibition offers a selection of products, demonstrators, videos and art objects that highlight the ways in which online social media now are becoming an important part of the functionality, design and desirability of new products and services. As products and services become increasingly digital and disappear into screens, Hybrids exemplifies some alternative strategies, where some of the magic of the social web seep out into the physical world through tangible things.

There are a number of products and services on show, including a new project by Jørn Knutsen and Einar Sneve Martinussen:

10 september - 12 42

Related things:

  1. RFID and physical social networks Poken is offering a physical networking platform, with physical, RFID-based objects that plug into a PC via USB (where have we heard that before?) A Poken is a connected business card, when you meet……
  2. Hybrid World Lab I’m pleased to announce that we will be involved in the Hybrid World Lab at Mediamatic in Amsterdam from 7 – 11 May 2007: Mediamatic organizes a new workshop in which the participants develop……
  3. New film: Wireless in the World 2 In this film, Wireless in the world 2, simple visualisations of radio ‘spaces’ are overlaid into urban spaces. The film has been made as a follow up to this video experiment and has been……
  4. Physical hyperlinks presentation at XTech Our presentation on Physical Hyperlinks has been accepted to XTech 2007. The presentation will be an overview of some of the concepts around physical hyperlinking, and perhaps some ideas about why it may not……
  5. Hybrid World Lab slides This week at the Hybrid World Lab at Mediamatic I have given five presentations related to NFC, physical, tangible, social interactions and design methodology. Here are the slides for each of those presentations. They……
Via: Touch
Internet of Things, people, playstudies

Alternate Reality Gaming

June 3, 2011

The Alternate Reality Gaming Network is the largest and most complete news resource available for players of online collaborative Alternate Reality Games. For many years, this site was the central hub for an affiliate network of sites that were independently owned and operated by volunteers for the enjoyment of themselves and the ARG community. In October of 2006, the site’s focus switched over to being a news network first and foremost, and will continue to operate in this facility. Simply put, ARGNet is the place to be when news breaks about new ARGs, as it offers insightful, investigative reporting from dedicated, knowledgeable volunteers through articles, interviews and netcast