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Smart Objects – ..
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Category: Smart Objects

Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Tools

Great Wave Data

October 16, 2016

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With augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) becoming the next computing platforms, app developers have been increasingly focused on building AR and VR apps.

One of the companies that aim to be on the cutting edge of Analytics VR and AR app development is GREAT WAVE. By helping people understand and analyze data more quickly, such a tool could provide richer, more insightful experiences than the ones derived from paper and screens. Studies conducted by researchers at Stanford and by the neuroscience and analytics team of the AR developers META (in conjunction with Accenture) demonstrate how the use of 3D information could amplify people’s efficiency and ability to focus on tasks.

Have a look at the video of GREAT WAVE:

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

2D vs 3D

September 8, 2016

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Given the lack of studies that have systematically examined the perceptual cues that our brains use to rapidly process procedural tasks – META decided to partner with Accenture Labs on a pilot study examining the use of perceptual cues in AR. More specifically, they wanted to measure the effect an additional perceptual cue (motion) would have on the time it takes to complete a procedural task. The team operated under the hypothesis that integrating both stereo and motion perceptual cues could further reduce the limitations of 2D instructions – ultimately enabling people to more quickly complete a procedural task.

At this year’s Bay to Breakers pre-race expo, the colorful annual footrace in San Francisco (California), the team of Meta and Accenture researchers set up the procedural task of assembling a physical lighthouse Lego set.

They defined three conditions based on the different types of instructions participants were to receive:2D Paper, Holographic Static 3D (Stereo Cue), and Holographic Dynamic 3D (Stereo & Motion Cues).

Comparing the three instruction conditions, they found that Dynamic 3D Instructions enabled participants to more quickly complete each step. Participants using Static 3D Instructions and 2D Paper Instructions were much slower in comparison. This confirmed their hypothesis that the use of both the stereo and motion perceptual cues in AR instructions speeds up assembly time. Interestingly enough, the researchers found that participants using Static 3D Instructions were the slowest of the three instruction conditions. This was especially surprising to them because based on past studies conducted in 2003 and 2013 , they expected people using any kind of 3D instructions to perform the Lego building task more quickly than those using paper 2D Paper Instructions.

Check out this video:

Design, HCI, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Artificial Theatre

May 17, 2016

I invited Louis-Philippe Demers for a talk at our CGI – International Seminar series.

Louis-Philippe Demers makes large-scale installations and performances. His projects can be found in theatre, opera, subway stations, art museums, science museums, music events and trade shows. Over the past two decades, he participated in more than seventy artistic and stage productions and has built more than 350 machines.

Demers was Professor of Digital Media and Exhibit Design/Scenography at the Hochschule fuer Gestaltung Karlsruhe, affiliated to the world renowned Zentrum fuer Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM, Germany). Since he joined the Interaction and Entertainment Research Centre and the newly founded School of Art, Design and Media at the Nanyang Technological University.

On the talk: Theatre has always been the test bed of illusions. The illusion of the actor replaced by a machine signifies the fantasies found in the scientific and the science-fiction communities. However, what Louis-Philippe Demers is targeting here is not the artifice but the uncomfortable communalities between the flesh and the mechanical bodies. Having these radical encounters at the liminal space bordering man and machine, it forces audiences to (re)consider their human bodies and the latest transforms in the history of their own embodied experiences.

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Books, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

Transdiscourse

March 4, 2016

Contributed a chapter on “Empathetic Things” to the publication ” Transdiscourse 2- Turbulence and Reconstruction”, De Gruyter.

Turbulence and Reconstruction is an anthology of viewpoints on society from the arts and the sciences. The authors believe that the arts and the sciences are effective spaces to encourage us to think differently about our outdated concepts of representation and categorization and reconstruct new potentials about how the designs of the future might benefit our environment and the survival of our bodies. Essential to all writers is the need to drop our old disciplinary boundaries to question our interdependent relationship to technology and to reality. Turbulence and reconstruction are processes that not only affect our representation and categorization, urban nature and energy consumption but also our relation to media and technology – the digital ideologies of interaction and substitution.

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Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Uncategorized

Augmented Narratives

February 10, 2016

I started my new research-project on Augmented Narratives which will involve the platforms of META2 and OCTAGON. For users, good UX-design for Augmented Reality platforms should facilitate physical and psychological immersion in the mediated experience. A holistic, multi-dimensional approach that incorporates qualitative experience and a deep understanding of the psychological aspects of optimum user experience are an imperative for such environments to be successful.

The creation of such a flexible, holistic, and enveloping environment that allows well-tuned variations and personalized adjustments, requires new forms of digital storytelling and the application of new user experience-design paradigms – based on a deep knowledge of the users’ data-scape. How can we can assess and organize these new worlds – in order to create the best experiences?

augmented-narratives-small

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Uncategorized

Tango

December 2, 2015

Had the chance to explore Google’s Tango with a team of developers. Great software and it is to hope that it can live up to its potential. The first consumer implementation will be in a package with Lenovo’s PHAB PRO later this year.
The essential aim is to give your mobile device full spatial awareness, or the ability to understand your environment and your relation to it, to get your smartphone to understand the world around it, enabling it to provide augmented reality experiences. A Project Tango device ‘sees’ the environment around it through a combination of three core functions.

First up is motion tracking, which allows the device to understand its position and orientation using a range of sensors (including accelerometer and gyroscope). Further, it involves depth perception, it is able to examine the shape of the world around you. Here it relies on Intel’s RealSense 3D camera. it helps the device to gain accurate gesture control and snappy 3D object rendering among a number of other features.

Additionally, Project Tango incorporates area learning, which means that it maps out and remembers the area around it.

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Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Augmented Reality: Theory and Practice

May 4, 2015

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by Dieter Schmalstieg (Author), Tobias Hollerer (Author)

Augmented Reality (AR) is one of today’s most fascinating and future-oriented areas of computer science and technology. By overlaying computer-generated information on views of the real world, AR amplifies human perception and cognition in remarkable new ways. Do you like the virtual first-down line in football games on TV? That’s AR — and AR apps are rapidly coming to billions of smartphones, too. Working in AR requires knowledge from diverse disciplines, including computer vision, computer graphics, and human-computer interaction (HCI).

 

Augmented Reality: Principles and Practice integrates all this knowledge into one single-source reference, presenting the most significant AR work with scrupulous accuracy. Dieter Schmalstieg, a pioneer of both AR foundation and application, is drawing from his two decades of AR experience to clearly present the field. Together with mobile AR pioneer and research colleague Tobias Höllerer he addresses all aspects of the field, illuminating AR from both technical and HCI perspectives. The authors review AR’s technical foundations, including display and tracking technologies, show how AR emerges from the symbiosis of computer vision and computer graphics, introduce AR-specific visualization and 3D interaction techniques, and showcase applications from diverse industries. They conclude with an outlook on trends and emerging technologies, including practical pointers for beginning practitioners.

 

Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Mobile Social and Fun: Games for Health

September 8, 2014

mobilehealth

This complimentary report authored by independent analyst Bonnie Feldman with input from MobiHealthNews covers much of the activity going on in the mobile-enabled games for health space. Mobile Social and Fun: Games for Health will appeal to readers who are both new to the subject and, thanks to the dozens of sources interviewed, those who have worked in mobile health games for years.

Download the pdf of the report here

Via: mobilehealthnews

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Garments of Paradise: Wearable Discourse in the Digital Age

July 20, 2014

 

 


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by Susan Elizabeth Ryan

Wearable technology — whether a Walkman in the 1970s, an LED-illuminated gown in the 2000s, or Google Glass today — makes the wearer visible in a technologically literate environment. Twenty years ago, wearable technology reflected cultural preoccupations with cyborgs and augmented reality; today, it reflects our newer needs for mobility and connectedness. In this book, Susan Elizabeth Ryan examines wearable technology as an evolving set of ideas and their contexts, always with an eye on actual wearables — on clothing, dress, and the histories and social relations they represent. She proposes that wearable technologies comprise a pragmatics of enhanced communication in a social landscape. “Garments of paradise” is a reference to wearable technology’s promise of physical and mental enhancements. Ryan defines “dress acts” — hybrid acts of communication in which the behavior of wearing is bound up with the materiality of garments and devices — and focuses on the use of digital technology as part of such systems of meaning. She connects the ideas of dress and technology historically, in terms of major discourses of art and culture, and in terms of mass media and media culture, citing such thinkers as Giorgio Agamben, Manuel De Landa, and Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. She examines the early history of wearable technology as it emerged in research labs; the impact of ubiquitous and affective approaches to computing; interaction design and the idea of wearable technology as a language of embodied technology; and the influence of open source ideology. Finally, she considers the future, as wearing technologies becomes an increasingly naturalized aspect of our social behavior.
Buy the book
Ambient Intelligence, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Augmented Reality: Engagement Beyond Usability

July 18, 2014

Augmented reality describes the process of using technology to overlay virtual information onto the real world to ‘augment,’ or add value, to our experience. Augmented reality applications are unique in that because they project virtual information into a user’s physical environment, they effectively blend real and virtual. They are also increasingly mobile and social. These features amplify the level of impact and persuasive power of the user experience — when done right.

All kinds of things go into success. And you might argue that usability is the key. But at the highest level, success depends on more than usability; it depends upon user experience. User experience is more than all those things combined. Of course, you still need to follow best practices for good usability because if people can’t do something they can’t be persuaded by it. But usability is no longer a key differentiator. It’s not enough.

Pamela Rutledge, Media Psychologist, Social Media and Transmedia Storytelling Strategist at the Media Psychology Research Center, gave the following presentation on these topics recently at WorldComp12 EEE.

Presentation overview:
1. Defining engagement
2. The need for a holistic evaluation of user and customer experience to achieve engagement.
3.  The role of the of the brain in achieving psychological engagement and outline the 3-brain model that you can use as a rule of thumb in your design and marketing decisions
4. Mapping brain behavior on to two theories of optimal engagement: Flow and Narrative Transportation.   Flow is optimal engagement for task-based activities.  Using story or narrative is an equally powerful way to achieve optimal engagement in narrative-based products and properties where the goal is experiential rather than task-based.
7. The similarities and differences between Flow and Narrative immersion as goals are critical to designing, developing and evaluating mobile and immersive technologies like AR.
8. Introduces the Positive Engagement Evaluation model

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects

Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things

July 15, 2014

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In the tradition of Who Owns the Future? and The Second Machine Age, an MIT Media Lab scientist imagines how everyday objects can intuit our needs and improve our lives.

We are now standing at the precipice of the next transformative development: the Internet of Things. Soon, connected technology will be embedded in hundreds of everyday objects we already use: our cars, wallets, watches, umbrellas, even our trash cans. These objects will respond to our needs, come to know us, and learn to think on our behalf. David Rose calls these devices—which are just beginning to creep into the marketplace—Enchanted Objects.

Some believe the future will look like more of the same—more smartphones, tablets, screens embedded in every conceivable surface. Rose has a different vision: technology that atomizes, combining itself with the objects that make up the very fabric of daily living. Such technology will be woven into the background of our environment, enhancing human relationships and channeling desires for omniscience, long life, and creative expression. The enchanted objects of fairy tales and science fiction will enter real life.

Groundbreaking, timely, and provocative, Enchanted Objects is a blueprint for a better future, where efficient solutions come hand in hand with technology that delights our senses. It is essential reading for designers, technologists, entrepreneurs, business leaders, and anyone who wishes to understand the future and stay relevant in the Internet of Things.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

From Self-Tracking to Smart Urban Infrastructures

July 4, 2014

 

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From self-tracking to smart urban infrastructures: Towards an interdisciplinary research agenda on Big Data

– interesting article by Francisco R. Klauser and Anders Albrechtslund

 

Abstract

Recent debates on surveillance have emphasised the now myriad possibilities of automated, software-based data gathering, management and analysis. One of the many terms used to describe this phenomenon is ‘Big Data’. The field of Big Data covers a large and complex range of practices and technologies from smart borders to CCTV video analysis, and from consumer profiling to self-tracking applications. The paper’s aim is to explore the surveillance dynamics inherent in contemporary Big Data trends. To this end, the paper adopts two main perspectives concerned with two complementary expressions of Big Data: (1) the individual use of various techniques of self-surveillance and tracking and (2) the simultaneous trend to optimise urban infrastructures through smart information technologies. Drawing upon exploratory research conducted by the authors, the paper shows that both expressions of Big Data present a range of common surveillance dynamics on at least four levels: agency, temporality, spatiality and normativity. On these grounds, the paper highlights a series of important issues to explore in future research.

Download pdf

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

Wearing Embodied Emotions: A Practice Based Design Research on Wearable Technology

April 29, 2014

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by Secil Ugur (Author)

Today, people are in an era of digitally mediated Human-to-Human Interaction, which cannot provide full sensorial contact and therefore, emotions cannot be communicated completely. The intimate cover of the human body, i.e. garment is the interface, where many personal traits are embodied. With the improvements in textile and electronics industry, this embodiment can be carried on a higher level, where the garments become dynamic interfaces and extensions of the human body. This book consists of a research on skin, clothes and technology as extensions of human body, emotions, technology-mediated emotions and a design practice that explores the communicative level of wearable technology through turning it into a living surface, which can convert intangible data to tangible in order to provide an emotional communication. This book aims to show how Human-Technology interaction is carried into an alternative context, where technology dissolves in use and starts serving for enhancing HHI.
Books, Design, HCI, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Visualization and Engineering Design Graphics with Augmented Reality

March 10, 2014

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This book is designed as a learning tool to help the aspiring engineer learn the language of engineering graphics. In this regard, this book is hardly unique, as there have been literally hundreds of books published in the past that had a similar goal. The main challenge faced by engineering graphics books comes from the difficulty of representing and describing three dimensional information on paper, which is a consequence of the two dimensional nature of printed materials.

What makes this book invaluable is the use of Augmented Reality, a technology that will allow you to escape the limitations of traditional materials enabling you, the student, to truly visualize the objects being described in full 3D. To take full advantage of this book you will need a smartphone, tablet or computer with a web camera, along with the software or apps provided*. Many parts of the book are linked to specific augmented reality content through a series of black and white markers that have been seamlessly integrated throughout the pages. In order to experience the content, your device s camera must be pointed at these markers. The main marker, available at the beginning of the book, is used to interact with the augmented reality models, which will be rendered in real time in your device s screen.

* If you do not have an iOS device, Android device or a computer with a webcam, SolidWorks files of the models used throughout the book are included on the CD. In addition, STL files have been provided so the models can be opened using your solid modeling CAD package of choice or printed using a 3D printer.

 

Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Computer Systems Experiences of Users with and Without Disabilities: An Evaluation Guide for Professionals

November 27, 2013

computersystems users

This book provides the necessary tools for the evaluation of the interaction between the user who is disabled and the computer system that was designed to assist that person. It creates an evaluation process able to assess the user’s satisfaction with a developed system. It takes into account all of the individuals involved in the evaluation process. It presents a new theoretical perspective in the human computer interaction evaluation of disabled persons.

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Understanding Augmented Reality: Concepts and Applications

November 8, 2013

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by Alan B. Craig  (Author)

Augmented reality is one of the newest innovations in the electronics industry. It is the superimposing of graphics, audio and other sense enhancements onto real-time environments – combining the physical and virtual worlds. Recent examples include the following: on TV, you have the super-imposed first down line in football games; on cell phones, apps now use the phone’s camera and GPS capabilities to gather info about one’s surrounding area, overlaying this information on the phone’s screen. The essential components of Augmented Reality are simple: A computer (cell phone or laptop), a camera, sensors (GPS, touch, accelerometer, compass) and finally tracking software. But there are so many ways to develop AR technologies. Some applications are dependent on computer vision algorithms; others use other devices such as GPS, gyroscopes, accelerometers and other sensors. Likewise, numerous software libraries are emerging that offer different approaches to AR technologies. It is confusing, at best, trying to determine the best approach to take, and the most appropriate system architecture and software to use when developing your own AR applications. Enter this book – a technical overview to the entire medium that provides the necessary background of what AR really is, the lay of the land in terms of hardware, software, interaction techniques, content development, and usability concerns to prepare you to create compelling and appropriate AR applications. You can explore the different techniques and approaches used in developing AR applications. This book helps untangle the seemingly endless different approaches that are being taken in the market today. You can learn from the author’s deep experience in virtual reality and augmented reality applications to succeed right off the bat, and avoid many of the traps that catch new developers. Associated website includes: sample projects and additional code, cool application examples available for download, links to interesting applications that support the points being made in the book.
Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

The Silent Intelligence: The Internet of Things

September 20, 2013

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The Silent Intelligence is a book about the Internet of Things. We talk about the history, trends, technology ecosystem and future of Connected Cities, Connected Homes, Connected Health and Connected Cars. We also discuss the most exciting growth areas for entrepreneurs and venture capital investors. We share exciting stories and unique opinions of more than 30 industry veterans, experts and visionaries from Google, Ericsson, AT&T, Qualcomm, SAP, MIT, Jawbone and many others. We called this book The Silent Intelligence because most of the activity and growth in the space so far has been outside of mainstream visibility. Our aim is to help executives, entrepreneurs, investors and everybody who is interested in this topic, better understand the opportunities and challenges of the Internet of Things. We also hope that the new growth opportunities discussed in this book will be as exciting to you as they are to us.
Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools

Wearable devices

November 20, 2012

Consumers are adopting technology faster than ever: Witness the rapid mainstreaming of devices such as the Apple iPad and Microsoft Kinect for Xbox 360. As some argue wearable devices will be next. Wearable devices, or “wearables” for short, have enormous potential for uses in health and fitness, navigation, social networking, commerce, and media.

In a new report, Forrester argues that wearables will move mainstream once they get serious investment from the “big five” platforms — Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook — and their developer communities.

A blog post by the research company lists the key take-aways.

> More reflections by The New York Times | TechCrunch

Meanwhile, interaction-design.org has published an extensive chapter on wearable computing, in collaboration with Steven Mann, a tenured professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto.

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

Augmented Reality: An Emerging Technologies Guide to AR

November 14, 2012

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With the explosive growth in mobile phone usage and rapid rise in search engine technologies over the last decade, augmented reality (AR) is poised to be one of this decade’s most disruptive technologies, as the information that is constantly flowing around us is brought into view, in real-time, through augmented reality. In this cutting-edge book, the authors outline and discuss never-before-published information about augmented reality and its capabilities. With coverage of mobile, desktop, developers, security, challenges, and gaming, this book gives you a comprehensive understanding of what augmented reality is, what it can do, what is in store for the future and most importantly: how to benefit from using AR in our lives and careers.

  • Educates readers how best to use augmented reality regarless of industry
  • Provides an in-depth understanding of AR and ideas ranging from new business applications to new crime fighting methods
  • Includes actual examples and case studies from both private and government applications
Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing

October 25, 2012

brainfluence

Brainfluence explains how to practically apply neuroscience and behavior research to better market to consumers by understanding their decision patterns. This application, called neuromarketing, studies the way the brain responds to various cognitive and sensory marketing stimuli. Analysts use this to measure a consumer’s preference, what a customer reacts to, and why consumers make certain decisions. Roger Dooley is the creator and publisher of Neuromarketing, the most popular blog on using brain and behavior research in marketing, advertising, and sales.

Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory

Immersive experiences with diegetic interfaces

September 3, 2012

Imon Deshmukh believes  that interfaces can be more closely integrated with the environment in which they operate. In an article on the Cooper blog, he shares some of what he heas learned from the universe of video games and how it might be applicable to other kinds of designed experiences.

  • “A key area of the problem lies in how we’re presented and interact with complex information diegetically, that is, interfaces that actually exist within the game world itself.” […]
  • Technology seems to be finally overcoming the restrictions that have kept diegetic interfaces limited to gimmickry until now. While still in its infancy, the push to duplicate more of our natural interactions with our environment seems to be gaining momentum as evidenced by new products using non-traditional interaction models. Most of them, like the popular Nintendo Wii, have yet to deal with immersion in terms of interfaces. On the other hand, Microsoft’s, whose controller-free gaming technology Kinect is about to enter the market, has stated its intention to eliminate what it calls the “barrier” between the player and the game world.”

Read article

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

11 Gambits for influencing user behaviour

August 5, 2012
In his blog, Dan Lockton, a Ph.D. researcher at Brunel University (UK), describes eleven behavioural change patterns “drawn from games or modelled on more playful forms of influencing behaviour.”

  • “My main interest here is to extract the design techniques as very simple design patterns or ‘gambits’* that can be applied in other design situations outside games themselves, where designers would like to influence user behaviour (along with the other Design with Intent techniques). So these are (at least at present) presented simply as provocations: a “What if…?” question plus an example. The intention is that the card deck version will simply have what you see here, while the online version will have much more detail, references, links and reader/user-contributed examples and comments.”

Read article

Books, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects

Ethnographies of the Videogame

Ethnographies of the Videogame: Gender, Narrative and Praxis
by Helen Thornham, City University London, UK
Ethnographies of the Videogame
Ashgate, July 2011, 218 pages
[Amazon UK link]
Ethnographies of the Videogame  uses the medium of the videogame to explore wider significant sociological issues around new media, interaction, identity, performance, memory and mediation. Addressing questions of how we interpret, mediate and use media texts, particularly in the face of claims about the power of new media to continuously shift the parameters of lived experience, gaming is employed as a ‘tool’ through which we can understand the gendered and socio-culturally constructed phenomenon of our everyday engagement with media.

The book is particularly concerned with issues of agency and power, identifying strong correlations between perceptions of gaming and actual gaming practices, as well as the reinforcement, through gaming, of established (gendered, sexed, and classed) power relationships within households. As such, it reveals the manner in which existing relations re-emerge through engagement with new technology.

Offering an empirically grounded understanding of what goes on when we mediate technology and media in our everyday lives Ethnographies of the Videogame is more than a timely intervention into game studies. It provides pertinent and reflexive commentary on the relationship between text and audience, highlighting the relationships of gender and power in gaming practice. As such, it will appeal to scholars interested in media and new media, gender and class, and the sociology of leisure.

Helen Thornham is Lecturer in Sociology and Media at City University, London, UK

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Internet of Things, people, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

A sense of place, a world of Augmented Reality

July 5, 2012
 

augmented-reality-02

Architectural historian Mitchell Schwarzer has published a two-part essay that explores how technology — especially the real-time, mediating imageries of augmented reality — influences how we perceive and inhabit place.“We’re in the first stage of a transformation of our sense of place,” he writes, “as momentous as that which occurred a couple of centuries ago, when products from smoke-stacked factories forged modern society.” Today, he argues, the “convergence of mobile phone, camera, wireless Internet and satellite communication — the key ingredients of the digital handheld — accelerates the reconstitution of place from real, occupied space to a collage of here and there, past and present.”

Mitchell Schwarzer is Professor of Visual Studies at California College of the Arts and a historian of architecture, landscape and urbanism.

Read article: Part 1 | Part 2

Via: Experienta

 

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Smart surfaces

June 9, 2012

Whether luminous wallpaper, curtains that produce electricity, or self-cleaning windowpanes, more than ever before innovations in surface technologies are influencing and will continue to revolutionize the use of materials in architecture, interior design, and design.

The new smart surfaces expand considerably design possibilities for architects and designers. Their use leads to new typologies and concepts that can also do justice to changes in expectations for buildings and design.

The impression we have of a building or an object is increasingly determined by its surface qualities. Designers are thus confronted anew with the question of “appropriate materials” when dealing with smart surfaces.

Smart Surfaces brings these design fields into the creative focus of planners and designers, and emphasizes concrete possibilities for applications. Planning fundamentals, including cost-benefit analyses, and questions related to building, including details of constructions, are presented in a clear and intelligible way. The various materials are introduced and their potentials assessed. Smart Surfaces not only offers a good overview of the themes but also provides inspiration for making use of these new surfaces.

A book for everyone who wishes to be inspired by the possibilities for innovative surface technologies.

Book at Amazon.

HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

The Grand Delusion: Why nothing is at it seems

June 6, 2012

This might come as a shock, but everything you think is wrong. Much of what you take for granted about day-to-day existence is largely a figment of your imagination. From your senses to your memory, your opinions and beliefs, how you see yourself and others and even your sense of free will, things are not as they seem. The power these delusions hold over you is staggering, yet, as Graham Lawton discovers and reports in The New Scientist, they are vital to help you function in the world.

What you see is not what you get
Your senses are your windows on the world, and you probably think they do a fair job at capturing an accurate depiction of reality. Don’t kid yourself.

Blind to bias
Do you see the world through a veil of prejudice and self-serving hypocrisies? Or is it just other people who do that?

Head full of half-truths
One of the most important components of your self-identity – your autobiographical memory – is little more than an illusion.

Egotist, moi?
Most drivers think they’re better than average. Most people think they’re less likely to have an inflated self-opinion than average. See the problem?

Who’s in control?
The more we learn about the brain, the less plausible it becomes that we have free will.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, Smart Objects

IkebanaMedulla

June 5, 2012

IkebanaMedulla is inhabited, like a spring of water – a trickle that seems to be immobile but which comes to life when we approach it. With its inwardness and strange beauty, this Medusa-like vase is between animal and machine, like a mechanical spider out of Matrix. A new step in the composition of domestic interior landscape.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools

The NETLab Toolkit

June 4, 2012

The NETLab Toolkit is a system for integrating tangible interaction and media. Designed for project sketching and production, the toolkit enables novices and experts to integrate hardware, media and interactive behaviors for products, installations, and research.

This free collection of software makes it easy integrate all kinds of media with microcontrollers like the Arduino. Using a simple drag-and-drop interface, you can create interactive projects that combine sensors, video, text, graphics, sound, lighting, motors and more. These projects can be created quickly, without programming, using the smart widgets included with the Toolkit.


The NETLab Toolkit is a project of Philip van Allen and the New Ecology of Things Lab in the Media Design Program at Art Center College of Design. Ewan Branda is the developer of the NETLab Toolkit Hub.

Ambient Intelligence, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects

The smart city is you

April 20, 2012

Usman Haque, founder of Pachube.com and director at Haque Design + Research and CEO of Connected Environments, published a post at Wired UK. He argues current Smart Cities initiatives’ strategies focus strongly on the city as a single entity, rather than the people.

  • “Initiatives are looking for a one-size fits all, top-down strategic approach to sustainability, citizen well-being and economic development. In short, their strategies focus on the city as a single entity, rather than the people — citizens — that bring it to life.
  • Any adequate model for the smart city must focus on the smartness of its citizens and encourage the processes that make cities important: those that sustain very different — sometimes conflicting — activities. Cities are, by definition, engines of diversity so focusing solely on streamlining utilities, transport, construction and unseen government processes can be massively counter-productive, in much the same way that the 1960s idealistic fondness for social-housing tower block economic efficiency was found, ultimately, to be socially and culturally unsustainable.
  • We, citizens, create and recreate our cities with every step we take, every conversation we have, every nod to a neighbour, every space we inhabit, every structure we erect, every transaction we make. A smart city should help us increase these serendipitous connections. It should actively and consciously enable us to contribute to data-making (rather than being mere consumers of it), and encourage us to make far better use of data that’s already around us.
  • Any adequate model for the smart city must focus on the smartness of its citizens and encourage the processes that make cities important: those that sustain very different — sometimes conflicting — activities. Cities are, by definition, engines of diversity so focusing solely on streamlining utilities, transport, construction and unseen government processes can be massively counter-productive, in much the same way that the 1960s idealistic fondness for social-housing tower block economic efficiency was found, ultimately, to be socially and culturally unsustainable.
  • We, citizens, create and recreate our cities with every step we take, every conversation we have, every nod to a neighbour, every space we inhabit, every structure we erect, every transaction we make. A smart city should help us increase these serendipitous connections. It should actively and consciously enable us to contribute to data-making (rather than being mere consumers of it), and encourage us to make far better use of data that’s already around us.”


HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Smart Objects, Tools

OnObject

April 10, 2012

OnObject is a small device user wears on hand to program physical objects to respond to gestural triggers. Attach an RFID tag to any objects, grab them by the tag, and program their responses to your grab, release, shake, swing, and thrust gestures using built in microphone or on-screen interface.

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Theory

The Internet of People for a Post-Oil World

March 12, 2012

 

 

 

postoilear

 

Christian Nold and Rob van Kranenburg
Paperback, 67 pages
The Architectural League of New York

In Situated Technologies Pamphlets 8, Christian Nold and Rob van Kranenburg articulate the foundations of a future manifesto for an Internet of Things in the public interest. Nold and Kranenburg propose tangible design interventions that challenge an internet dominated by commercial tools and systems, emphasizing that people from all walks of life have to be at the table when we talk about alternate possibilities for ubiquitous computing. Through horizontally scaling grass roots efforts along with establishing social standards for governments and companies to allow cooperation, Nold and Kranenberg argue for transforming the Internet of Things into an Internet of People.

Download pamphlet (pdf)

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Tools

Proximeter

January 24, 2012

The Proximeter is an ambient social navigation instrument that tracks the past and future proximity of one’s social cloud in an ambient display. By reading existing calendar and social network feeds, and abstracting these into a glanceable pattern of paths, it nurtures a social proprioception, creating more face-to-face interactions.

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Conferences, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

The technology-enabled city is an untapped source of sustainable growth

December 5, 2011
 
Arup, The Climate Group, Accenture and Horizon, University of Nottingham
published and interesting report:

The technology-enabled city is an untapped source of sustainable growth.

“Written in partnership with The Climate Group, Accenture and Horizon, University of Nottingham, this report investigates how technology can be used in cities to meet the growing challenges of expanding urbanisation.

The technology-enabled city is an untapped source of sustainable growth and represents a powerful approach for tackling unprecedented environmental and economic challenges.

By unlocking technology, infrastructure and public data, cities can open up new value chains, spawning innovative applications and information products that make sustainable modes of city living and working possible.

While smart initiatives are underway in urban centres around the world, most cities have yet to realise the enormous potential value from fully-integrated, strategically-designed smart city development programmes.

Now is the time for government and business leaders to recognise the value created by smart city thinking.”

Ambient Intelligence, Conferences, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Theory, Videos

Designing for an Internet of Things

November 25, 2011

 

NESTA organised an event on Tuesday 22 November in London, that looked at the challenges of designing for an Internet of Things.The speakers: pioneers Usman Haque, founder of Pachube, and Matt Jones, formerly at the BBC, Dopplr and Nokia, and now a principal at design agency BERG.

Videos:
Part 1: Usman Haque (17:20)
Part 2: Matt Jones (18:58)
Part 3: Q&A (26:49)

Ambient Intelligence, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Smart Objects, Tools

AirTiles

November 19, 2011

AirTiles is a novel modular device that allows users to create geometric shapes in the real world and add a flexible sensing space within the created shape. In this interactive audio/visual environment, users can freely manipulate and rotate the device and rotate it so that a geometrical shape appears on the floor.

Books, Design, playstudies, Smart Objects

Playreport by IKEA

August 5, 2011

Playreportis a global research project on children, families and play, initiated by IKEA.

The company conducted 11,000 interviews in 25 countries, and spoke to 8,000 parents and 3,000 children aged 7-12. It is therefore, according to IKEA, the largest global research project ever conducted on parenting, children and the state of play around the world.

The Playreport lives on on Ikea’s Facebook page, which invites experts and parents around the globe to join in the conversation in order to increase awareness and discussion about the value of play for kids.

Download the international summary of the Playreport (pdf)

(Via Creativity Online)

 

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

Divining a Digital Future: Mess and Mythology in Ubiquitous Computing

July 30, 2011

Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell
MIT Press, April 2011, 264 pages
ISBN 978-0-262-01555-4
264 pages
Amazon page | MIT Press pageUbiquitous computing (or “ubicomp”) is the label for a “third wave” of computing technologies. Following the eras of the mainframe computer and the desktop PC, ubicomp is characterized by small and powerful computing devices that are worn, carried, or embedded in the world around us. The ubicomp research agenda originated at Xerox PARC in the late 1980s; these days, some form of that vision is a reality for the millions of users of Internet-enabled phones, GPS devices, wireless networks, and “smart” domestic appliances.

In Divining a Digital Future, computer scientist Paul Dourish and cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell explore the vision that has driven the ubiquitous computing research program and the contemporary practices that have emerged–both the motivating mythology and the everyday messiness of lived experience.

Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the authors’ collaboration, the book takes seriously the need to understand ubicomp not only technically but also culturally, socially, politically, and economically. Dourish and Bell map the terrain of contemporary ubiquitous computing, in the research community and in daily life; explore dominant narratives in ubiquitous computing around such topics as infrastructure, mobility, privacy, and domesticity; and suggest directions for future investigation, particularly with respect to methodology and conceptual foundations.

Paul Dourish is Professor of Informatics at the University of California, Irvine, with courtesy appointments in Computer Science and in Anthropology. He conducts research in human-computer interaction, ubiquitous computing, and social studies of science and technology. Before joining UC Irvine, he was a Senior Member of Research Staff at Xerox PARC.

Genevieve Bell is an Intel Fellow and the Director of Intel’s first user-focused research and development lab, Interaction and Experience Research. A cultural anthropologist, she studies the relationship between information technology and cultural practice both in technology design and in settings of everyday use. Before joining Intel, she taught Anthropology and American Studies at Stanford University.

Ambient Intelligence, Conferences, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory

Lift France Conference

June 23, 2011

Lift France 11 is a three-day conference about current and emerging use of digital technologies and their effects on innovation, societal and economic transformation. Under the slogan “Be Radical!”, Lift France will focus on disruption: when (high- or low-) tech contributes to redefining a market’s terms of reference, a whole industry, a share of social life, etc. Participants come to better understand the challenges and opportunities presented by digital technologies, to meet the people who drive these innovations, and to share their own insights.

 

Conference program

The conference program allows you to discover new and emerging technologies, see real life examples of implementations in different contexts, and expand your horizons by exploring ideas from other fields and backgrounds.

Wednesday July 6, 2011

13:00 First time participants welcome
14:00 Workshops
18:30 Welcome party & drinks

Thursday July 7, 2011

09:00 Welcome
09:30 Workshops
12:30 Lunch
14:00 Keynote: Saskia Sassen
14:30 URBAN – Who needs to become “smart” in tomorrow’s cities?
16:00 CARE – Disruptive innovation in healthcare and well-being
17:30 10 disruptive pitches, 6 mn each
19:30 Gala evening & networking

Friday July 8, 2011

09:00 Workshops + Learning session
11:30 Keynote: Geoff Mulgan, The Young Foundation
12:00 WORK/LEARN – Transforming the way we work, innovate… and learn
14:00 SLOW – Can we use technology to take back control over how we, and our organizations, manage time?
15:45 OPEN – What happens when barriers to innovation become drastically lower?
17:00 Lift France’s wrapup and takeaways
17:30 Closing of the conference: Roger Malina, Philippe Lemoine
20:00 Closing party

See the full program.

Via: lift

HCI, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Videos

Sense-roid jacket will give you a hug

June 22, 2011

Experts say that hugs are important in the development of the child if dispensed during the appropriate moments, and it could build up one’s confidence in the long run. Well, for those who grew up with a lack of hugs and realized through counselling sessions and self-reflection moments that this could be the reason you do have some social hang ups, or rather, causing you to behave the way you do to a certain extent, here is the Sense-Roid jacket that might give you more hugs than you bargained for. Sense-Roid inventors hope to see this unique jacket function as a form of therapy to those who are far away from you, or perhaps being stuck in a traffic jam that hardly moved for hours on end.

Video


More information at Kajimoto Laboratory.

via ubergizmo and via Akihabara News

Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, people, Smart Objects, Theory

Core77 book reviews

June 11, 2011
Robert Blinn wrote a review on Core77 on the latest book by Donald Norman: Living with Complexity.

“While his book doesn’t exactly provide hard and fast rules for taming complexity, it does a very good job of framing the problem. After all, when the aspects of a problem are laid out clearly, problems begin to appear progressively less complex. Along the way, as Norman explains the problem, his text is accompanied by the usual assortment of author photographs of awkward and difficult devices. Digressing from the paradoxical nature of choosing from two rolls of toilet paper in a public restaurant to the “desire lines” caused by human behavior (creases in books and dead spots in public meadows where people walk), Norman covers social signifiers. He addresses forcing functions, grouping and countless other design/behavior problems. Norman even devotes an entire chapter to the nature of waiting in line (nearly every hospital does it wrong, and our recent visit to the Apple store on Prince Street showed that even Apple had stopped listing the names and timing of those in the queue, much to this reviewer’s consternation).”

Read article

Robert Blinn also reviewed Jon Kolko’s new book Exposing the Magic of Design (amazon) for Core77:

“Kolko’s book is subtitled “A Practitioner’s Guide to the Methods and Theory of Synthesis,” and this reviewer joked that it sounded like an undergraduate film or semiotics course. Kolko himself states that “the ability to ‘be playful’ is critical to achieve deep and meaningful synthesis,” but the tenor of the tome is far from the giant grin the author wears while using carrots as a “phone” on the cover of his previous work. Exposing the Magic of Design is blunt, direct, serious and self-assured. At less than 200 pages and full of diagrams, processes and methods, Kolko certainly didn’t have time for any hand-holding. In this era of easy distraction, Exposing the Magic‘s interaction design requires complete attention. Perhaps that’s the way the author meant it.”

Read review

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Gestural interfaces: a step backwards in usability

June 10, 2011
Donald A. Norman and Jakob Nielsen of the Nielsen Norman group argue about the usability of today’s gestural user interfaces.

One step forward, two steps back.

The usability crisis is upon us, once again. We suspect most of you thought it was over. After all, HCI certainly understands how to make things usable, so the emphasis has shifted to more engaging topics, such as exciting new applications, new technological developments, and the challenges of social networks and ubiquitous connection and communication. Well you are wrong.

“In a recent column for Interactions Norman pointed out that the rush to develop gestural interfaces – “natural” they are sometimes called – well-tested and understood standards of interaction design were being overthrown, ignored, and violated.

Recently, Raluca Budui and Hoa Loranger from the Nielsen Norman group performed usability tests on Apple’s iPad, reaching much the same conclusion. The new applications for gestural control in smart cellphones (notably the iPhone and the Android) and the coming arrival of larger screen devices built upon gestural operating systems (starting with Apple’s iPad) promise even more opportunities for well-intended developers to screw things up. […]

There are several important fundamental principles of interaction design that are completely independent of technology:
· Visibility (also called perceived affordances or signifiers)
· Feedback
· Consistency (also known as standards)
· Non-destructive operations (hence the importance of undo)
· Discoverability: All operations can be discovered by systematic exploration of menus
· Scalability. The operation should work on all screen sizes, small and large.
· Reliability. Operations should work. Period. And events should not happen randomly.

All these are rapidly disappearing from the toolkit of designers, aided, we must emphasize, by the weird design guidelines issued by Apple, Google, and Microsoft.”

Read article