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Tools – ..
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Category: Tools

Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Tools

Great Wave Data

October 16, 2016

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With augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) becoming the next computing platforms, app developers have been increasingly focused on building AR and VR apps.

One of the companies that aim to be on the cutting edge of Analytics VR and AR app development is GREAT WAVE. By helping people understand and analyze data more quickly, such a tool could provide richer, more insightful experiences than the ones derived from paper and screens. Studies conducted by researchers at Stanford and by the neuroscience and analytics team of the AR developers META (in conjunction with Accenture) demonstrate how the use of 3D information could amplify people’s efficiency and ability to focus on tasks.

Have a look at the video of GREAT WAVE:

Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Uncategorized

Augmented Narratives

February 10, 2016

I started my new research-project on Augmented Narratives which will involve the platforms of META2 and OCTAGON. For users, good UX-design for Augmented Reality platforms should facilitate physical and psychological immersion in the mediated experience. A holistic, multi-dimensional approach that incorporates qualitative experience and a deep understanding of the psychological aspects of optimum user experience are an imperative for such environments to be successful.

The creation of such a flexible, holistic, and enveloping environment that allows well-tuned variations and personalized adjustments, requires new forms of digital storytelling and the application of new user experience-design paradigms – based on a deep knowledge of the users’ data-scape. How can we can assess and organize these new worlds – in order to create the best experiences?

augmented-narratives-small

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Uncategorized

Tango

December 2, 2015

Had the chance to explore Google’s Tango with a team of developers. Great software and it is to hope that it can live up to its potential. The first consumer implementation will be in a package with Lenovo’s PHAB PRO later this year.
The essential aim is to give your mobile device full spatial awareness, or the ability to understand your environment and your relation to it, to get your smartphone to understand the world around it, enabling it to provide augmented reality experiences. A Project Tango device ‘sees’ the environment around it through a combination of three core functions.

First up is motion tracking, which allows the device to understand its position and orientation using a range of sensors (including accelerometer and gyroscope). Further, it involves depth perception, it is able to examine the shape of the world around you. Here it relies on Intel’s RealSense 3D camera. it helps the device to gain accurate gesture control and snappy 3D object rendering among a number of other features.

Additionally, Project Tango incorporates area learning, which means that it maps out and remembers the area around it.

12350_medium

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, HCI, playstudies, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

Magic Leap

October 26, 2015

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Magic Leap, Inc., a developer of novel human computing interfaces and software, announced in a newsletter the recent closing of its A round of venture capital. Magic Leap has now raised more than $50 million in its series seed and A rounds to develop its proprietary technology platform. Magic Leap will use the funds to advance the product development and commercialization of its proprietary human computing interface technology, known as “Cinematic RealityTM”.

At engagdet – Mariella Moon states that she can’t decipher what Magic Leap exactly is – but she argues that Magic Leap is:

a headset that superimposes digital images onto the real world. In that respect, it’s similar to Microsoft’s HoloLens, which is just slightly less mysterious (since we’ve actually seen it). But based on the things Abovitz said in his AMA at reddit, like “Our vision for AR and VR is a true replication of visual reality,” there’s a chance that it can also block the outside world entirely with virtual reality. (Update: Rachel Metz confirmed to engagdet on Twitter that it’s capable of doing full VR.)


This points out  that there’s a reason why the company is calling its technology “cinematic reality” rather than AR or VR: it works a bit differently than either of them. Standard AR and VR use stereoscopic 3D, a technique that tricks you into thinking an object is three-dimensional by showing each eye a different image and a different angle of the same object. The Oculus Rift and Samsung’s Gear VR headset are two well-known examples of this technique.

magic-leap

In his AMA Abovitz revealed that he’s not a fan of stereoscopic 3D and believes it can cause “temporary and/or permanent neurologic deficits.” So, Magic Leap uses a Lilliputian projector to shine light and images into the user’s eyes instead, the startup told Metz from MIT’s Technology Review. Your brain apparently won’t be able to detect the difference between light from the projector and light from the real world: The result is life-like digital images that show reflections like real physical objects would.

Sources:

Magic Leap

reddit

engagdet

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, playstudies, Tools

HoloLens

July 22, 2015

4 hololens

Microsoft HoloLens puts you at the center of a world that blends holograms with reality. With the ability to design and shape holograms, you’ll have a new medium to express your creativity, a more efficient way to teach and learn, and a more effective way to visualize your work and share ideas. Your digital content and creations will be more relevant when they come to life in the world around you.


Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Augmented Reality: Theory and Practice

May 4, 2015

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by Dieter Schmalstieg (Author), Tobias Hollerer (Author)

Augmented Reality (AR) is one of today’s most fascinating and future-oriented areas of computer science and technology. By overlaying computer-generated information on views of the real world, AR amplifies human perception and cognition in remarkable new ways. Do you like the virtual first-down line in football games on TV? That’s AR — and AR apps are rapidly coming to billions of smartphones, too. Working in AR requires knowledge from diverse disciplines, including computer vision, computer graphics, and human-computer interaction (HCI).

 

Augmented Reality: Principles and Practice integrates all this knowledge into one single-source reference, presenting the most significant AR work with scrupulous accuracy. Dieter Schmalstieg, a pioneer of both AR foundation and application, is drawing from his two decades of AR experience to clearly present the field. Together with mobile AR pioneer and research colleague Tobias Höllerer he addresses all aspects of the field, illuminating AR from both technical and HCI perspectives. The authors review AR’s technical foundations, including display and tracking technologies, show how AR emerges from the symbiosis of computer vision and computer graphics, introduce AR-specific visualization and 3D interaction techniques, and showcase applications from diverse industries. They conclude with an outlook on trends and emerging technologies, including practical pointers for beginning practitioners.

 

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Garments of Paradise: Wearable Discourse in the Digital Age

July 20, 2014

 

 


Screen shot 2015-03-04 at 21.16.54

 

by Susan Elizabeth Ryan

Wearable technology — whether a Walkman in the 1970s, an LED-illuminated gown in the 2000s, or Google Glass today — makes the wearer visible in a technologically literate environment. Twenty years ago, wearable technology reflected cultural preoccupations with cyborgs and augmented reality; today, it reflects our newer needs for mobility and connectedness. In this book, Susan Elizabeth Ryan examines wearable technology as an evolving set of ideas and their contexts, always with an eye on actual wearables — on clothing, dress, and the histories and social relations they represent. She proposes that wearable technologies comprise a pragmatics of enhanced communication in a social landscape. “Garments of paradise” is a reference to wearable technology’s promise of physical and mental enhancements. Ryan defines “dress acts” — hybrid acts of communication in which the behavior of wearing is bound up with the materiality of garments and devices — and focuses on the use of digital technology as part of such systems of meaning. She connects the ideas of dress and technology historically, in terms of major discourses of art and culture, and in terms of mass media and media culture, citing such thinkers as Giorgio Agamben, Manuel De Landa, and Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. She examines the early history of wearable technology as it emerged in research labs; the impact of ubiquitous and affective approaches to computing; interaction design and the idea of wearable technology as a language of embodied technology; and the influence of open source ideology. Finally, she considers the future, as wearing technologies becomes an increasingly naturalized aspect of our social behavior.
Buy the book
Ambient Intelligence, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

From Self-Tracking to Smart Urban Infrastructures

July 4, 2014

 

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From self-tracking to smart urban infrastructures: Towards an interdisciplinary research agenda on Big Data

– interesting article by Francisco R. Klauser and Anders Albrechtslund

 

Abstract

Recent debates on surveillance have emphasised the now myriad possibilities of automated, software-based data gathering, management and analysis. One of the many terms used to describe this phenomenon is ‘Big Data’. The field of Big Data covers a large and complex range of practices and technologies from smart borders to CCTV video analysis, and from consumer profiling to self-tracking applications. The paper’s aim is to explore the surveillance dynamics inherent in contemporary Big Data trends. To this end, the paper adopts two main perspectives concerned with two complementary expressions of Big Data: (1) the individual use of various techniques of self-surveillance and tracking and (2) the simultaneous trend to optimise urban infrastructures through smart information technologies. Drawing upon exploratory research conducted by the authors, the paper shows that both expressions of Big Data present a range of common surveillance dynamics on at least four levels: agency, temporality, spatiality and normativity. On these grounds, the paper highlights a series of important issues to explore in future research.

Download pdf

Books, Design, HCI, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Visualization and Engineering Design Graphics with Augmented Reality

March 10, 2014

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This book is designed as a learning tool to help the aspiring engineer learn the language of engineering graphics. In this regard, this book is hardly unique, as there have been literally hundreds of books published in the past that had a similar goal. The main challenge faced by engineering graphics books comes from the difficulty of representing and describing three dimensional information on paper, which is a consequence of the two dimensional nature of printed materials.

What makes this book invaluable is the use of Augmented Reality, a technology that will allow you to escape the limitations of traditional materials enabling you, the student, to truly visualize the objects being described in full 3D. To take full advantage of this book you will need a smartphone, tablet or computer with a web camera, along with the software or apps provided*. Many parts of the book are linked to specific augmented reality content through a series of black and white markers that have been seamlessly integrated throughout the pages. In order to experience the content, your device s camera must be pointed at these markers. The main marker, available at the beginning of the book, is used to interact with the augmented reality models, which will be rendered in real time in your device s screen.

* If you do not have an iOS device, Android device or a computer with a webcam, SolidWorks files of the models used throughout the book are included on the CD. In addition, STL files have been provided so the models can be opened using your solid modeling CAD package of choice or printed using a 3D printer.

 

Augmented Reality, Conferences, Design, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

The Leviathan Project

January 10, 2014

On January 6th 2012, at the Intel Pre-Conference Keynote at CES in Las Vegas – for the first time in public – Intel and USC World Building Media Lab unveiled the Leviathan – a giant Whale that swims above an audience of 5000, all reaching out to touch the creature flying overhead.

From the presentation:

We bring you an experiment in storytelling that shatters the membrane between audience and content. The Leviathan Project creates an immersive world in which audiences can engage, explore and physically experience virtual environments and fantastic characters.

We are playtesting a future where the design of a world precedes the telling of a story, and the richly detailed world becomes a container for countless narratives.

What Is 5D?

5D Institute is a cutting edge USC non-profit Organized Research Unit dedicated to the dissemination, education, and appreciation of the future of narrative media through World Building.

World Building designates a narrative practice in which the design of a world precedes the telling of a story; the richly detailed world becomes a container for narrative, producing stories that emerge logically and organically from its well-designed core.

World Building is founded on three beliefs, namely that storytelling is the most powerful system for the advancement of human capability due to its ability to allow the human imagination to precede the realization of thought; that all stories emerge logically and intuitively from the worlds that create them; and that new technologies powerfully enable us to sculpt the imagination into existence.

5D Institute is the world’s leading World Building collective. Our network of preeminent World Builders transcends borders and boundaries in film, animation, fashion, gaming, theatre, television, music, architecture, science, interactive media and more.

Through the newly cemented partnership with USC School of Cinematic Arts, 5D Institute is evolving into an unmatched connector between the next generation of young and undiscovered creators traversing the bleeding edge of innovation and companies who want to be at the frontlines of the new media landscape.

Since Oct 2008, we have come together at 5D’s distributed events to engage in a disruptive interrogation of our fractured disciplines, to create best practices and a new shared language across narrative media.

‘The neural sparking between left brain and right brain is at the core of 5D – we are moving into a landscape where art and science, design and engineering are inseparable. At their intersection lies the new creative laboratory for the future of our narrative practices.’

– Alex McDowell, 5D Institute Director

For more information:  5dinstitute.org/

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Understanding Augmented Reality: Concepts and Applications

November 8, 2013

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by Alan B. Craig  (Author)

Augmented reality is one of the newest innovations in the electronics industry. It is the superimposing of graphics, audio and other sense enhancements onto real-time environments – combining the physical and virtual worlds. Recent examples include the following: on TV, you have the super-imposed first down line in football games; on cell phones, apps now use the phone’s camera and GPS capabilities to gather info about one’s surrounding area, overlaying this information on the phone’s screen. The essential components of Augmented Reality are simple: A computer (cell phone or laptop), a camera, sensors (GPS, touch, accelerometer, compass) and finally tracking software. But there are so many ways to develop AR technologies. Some applications are dependent on computer vision algorithms; others use other devices such as GPS, gyroscopes, accelerometers and other sensors. Likewise, numerous software libraries are emerging that offer different approaches to AR technologies. It is confusing, at best, trying to determine the best approach to take, and the most appropriate system architecture and software to use when developing your own AR applications. Enter this book – a technical overview to the entire medium that provides the necessary background of what AR really is, the lay of the land in terms of hardware, software, interaction techniques, content development, and usability concerns to prepare you to create compelling and appropriate AR applications. You can explore the different techniques and approaches used in developing AR applications. This book helps untangle the seemingly endless different approaches that are being taken in the market today. You can learn from the author’s deep experience in virtual reality and augmented reality applications to succeed right off the bat, and avoid many of the traps that catch new developers. Associated website includes: sample projects and additional code, cool application examples available for download, links to interesting applications that support the points being made in the book.
Crowdsourcing, Design, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, Social Innovation, Tools

TrustCloud

August 17, 2013

 

TrustCloud is an online tool that aggregates peoples’ online social and transactional data, crunches it into a TrustScore and creates dynamic TrustCards that people can embed on their social networks. People use TrustCloud to establish their reputation on their social networks and peer-to-peer buying, selling, sharing and lending platforms.

TrustCloud-600x360trustcloud-how-is-trust-established-photo

TrustCloud likens itself to a FICO score that measures creditworthiness:

“TrustCloud gives members in the Sharing Economy the tools for Trust and Accountability that enable better decision-making and improves every transaction. We measure your virtuous online behaviors and transactions to build a portable TrustScore you can easily use within the Sharing Economy.”

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools

Wearable devices

November 20, 2012

Consumers are adopting technology faster than ever: Witness the rapid mainstreaming of devices such as the Apple iPad and Microsoft Kinect for Xbox 360. As some argue wearable devices will be next. Wearable devices, or “wearables” for short, have enormous potential for uses in health and fitness, navigation, social networking, commerce, and media.

In a new report, Forrester argues that wearables will move mainstream once they get serious investment from the “big five” platforms — Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook — and their developer communities.

A blog post by the research company lists the key take-aways.

> More reflections by The New York Times | TechCrunch

Meanwhile, interaction-design.org has published an extensive chapter on wearable computing, in collaboration with Steven Mann, a tenured professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto.

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

Augmented Reality: An Emerging Technologies Guide to AR

November 14, 2012

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With the explosive growth in mobile phone usage and rapid rise in search engine technologies over the last decade, augmented reality (AR) is poised to be one of this decade’s most disruptive technologies, as the information that is constantly flowing around us is brought into view, in real-time, through augmented reality. In this cutting-edge book, the authors outline and discuss never-before-published information about augmented reality and its capabilities. With coverage of mobile, desktop, developers, security, challenges, and gaming, this book gives you a comprehensive understanding of what augmented reality is, what it can do, what is in store for the future and most importantly: how to benefit from using AR in our lives and careers.

  • Educates readers how best to use augmented reality regarless of industry
  • Provides an in-depth understanding of AR and ideas ranging from new business applications to new crime fighting methods
  • Includes actual examples and case studies from both private and government applications
Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Tools

Superbetter – will this app make you better?

November 7, 2012

SuperBetter, is an online social game designed to build personal resilience in the face of a serious challenge — like an illness or injury, anxiety or depression. SuperBetter can also be used to make a major health change, like losing weight, quitting smoking, or eating better. Players are challenged to build up their core strengths of physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. SuperBetter helps you achieve your health goals — or recover from an illness or injury — by increasing your personal resilience. Resilience means staying curious, optimistic and motivated even in the face of the toughest challenges.

The creators of the game, SuperBetter Labs, initiated by Gamedesigner Jane McGonical apply technology and design to empower individuals and communities to lead “epic lives.” The lab focuses on creating games that are powered by strong social relationships, positive emotion, and a real sense of purpose. By bringing together science and wisdom with innovative technology and design, SuperBetter Labs explores how we can flourish best and achieve our full human potential — individually, and collectively.

SUPERBETTERinsert                                                                                                            Source: Superbetter

By creating a fully customizable experience backed up by strong scientific principles, SuperBetter allows any player to gain an experience and chase “epic wins”. Players are encouraged to find their “power ups”, small activities that boost their personal well-being while fighting off “bad guys”, activities and emotions that bring them down. In addition, various goal setting challenges and the ability to draw friends in, allows SuperBetter to create an engaging gaming experience with scientific data that is proven to encourage happiness and personal growth.

The creators point out that SuperBetter isn’t a game – “it’s just an awesome tool created by game designers who take the best of games and apply it to your real life so you can get stronger, happier, and healthier”. They state:

►► Why play SuperBetter?

Because you want to:
• Feel stronger every day
• Change what isn’t working
• Tackle a tough challenge
• Reach your goals
• Get more support, and support others
• Have more fun and live with meaning

►► Key Features

• Tackle real-life challenges with customized Quests
• Boost your health and mood with Power-Ups
• Identify Bad Guys that are holding you back
• Join forces with your friends and Allies
• Get advice from over 25 expert-created Power Packs
• Learn the cutting-edge science behind making changes that work

►► SuperBetter is Strength

SuperBetter builds personal resilience: the ability to stay strong, motivated, and optimistic even in the face of a tough challenge.

►► SuperBetter is Feeling Happier and Healthier

Research shows that resilience has a powerful effect on health by boosting physical and emotional well-being.

►► SuperBetter is Smart

Choose from over 25 Power Packs created by experts to help you with your challenges and goals, or design your own adventure for any area of life where you want to get stronger or feel better.

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SuperBetter was invented by game designers and created with guidance from doctors, psychologists, scientists, and medical researchers. The investigators of a clinical trial believe that SuperBetter, and positive play games like it, are promising novel interventions that could make a positive difference in the ability of our patients to successfully transition to self care after discharge from therapeutic care.

Press:  The SuperBetter Press page

Contact:  The SuperBetter Contact page

Scientific background: Superbetter-blog

Via: Games for Change

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Theory, Tools, Videos

FutureScapes – imagining the world in 2025

September 10, 2012

FutureScapes, an open collaboration project by Sony and Forum for the Future, aims to bring together a range of expert thinkers, designers, futurologists, writers (including those from The Economist’s Intelligence Unit and Wired Magazine) and you – the public – to explore the opportunities and challenges of life in 2025, and to consider the potential contribution that technology and entertainment can make in shaping a better, more sustainable future.

  • “FutureScapes is all about imagining what the world of 2025 will look like and the role technology could play in our lives.
  • To inspire you and provide a starting point for your thoughts we’ve come up with four different scenarios of the world we may be confronted with in 2025. These aren’t predictions of the future, but are intended to help us visualise the possibilities for our future and think about how we might plan for those possibilities now.
  • The written scenarios are a result of an open and collaborative process involving people across Sony and Forum for the Future, as well as leading futurologists and experts from a range of fields.

Watch videos
Download report

(via Bruce Sterling)

Books, Design, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Theory, Tools

Healthy Feedback Loops: Devices, Apps, and Portals

July 20, 2012

health

This complimentary report covers much of the activity going on in feedback loops in healthcare and ncludes a number of examples of different ways that consumer health companies are using various incentives to encourage users to make healthier decisions. It’s a worthwhile review for longtime MobiHealthNews readers, but also a great introductory report for those who recently joined the digital health fray. Healthy Feedback Loops Devices, Apps, and Portals will appeal to readers who are both new to the subject and those who have worked in mobile health for years.

Download the report

Via: MobileHealthNews

Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Tools

Augmented, Sensing and Mobile

July 15, 2012

wahoo_heart sensorjpg

Putting things first lists some of the new products that allow people to augment their sensing (and sense-making) through external sensors, with result summaries visualised on smartphones and the web:

Health and healthy living: AsthmaSense, DigiFit, FitBit, Up
Sleep: Lark Sensor (WSJ article), WakeMate, Zeo
Sports: Nike+ (running), Strava (cycling), Wahoo
Home energy: Nest Learning Thermostat
Plants (!): Koubachi

Via putting things first

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Smart surfaces

June 9, 2012

Whether luminous wallpaper, curtains that produce electricity, or self-cleaning windowpanes, more than ever before innovations in surface technologies are influencing and will continue to revolutionize the use of materials in architecture, interior design, and design.

The new smart surfaces expand considerably design possibilities for architects and designers. Their use leads to new typologies and concepts that can also do justice to changes in expectations for buildings and design.

The impression we have of a building or an object is increasingly determined by its surface qualities. Designers are thus confronted anew with the question of “appropriate materials” when dealing with smart surfaces.

Smart Surfaces brings these design fields into the creative focus of planners and designers, and emphasizes concrete possibilities for applications. Planning fundamentals, including cost-benefit analyses, and questions related to building, including details of constructions, are presented in a clear and intelligible way. The various materials are introduced and their potentials assessed. Smart Surfaces not only offers a good overview of the themes but also provides inspiration for making use of these new surfaces.

A book for everyone who wishes to be inspired by the possibilities for innovative surface technologies.

Book at Amazon.

Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Persuasive Technologies, Tools

Costumer service romance

June 7, 2012
An interesting project by Jayne Vidheecharoen:

This is a real interactive audio prototype, for the full experience please contact Customer Service, available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week:

  • USA Domestic: (206) 504-2025
  • Skype: +990009369996101162
  • Or you can listen to a recording of a call:

 

 

 

  • Overview
  • What happens when Customer Service bots start getting too smart? What if they start needing help too? How would they use the tools at their disposal to reach out to those they care about? What if they start caring about us a little too much?
  • Using Voxeo I built a working prototype of a Customer Service phone bot that has personal issues she’d like to talk about and over time falls in love with the caller. She uses the tools at her disposal (discounts, upgrades, hold music, confirmation numbers) to communicate her feelings towards you as best she can.
  • I was really excited to be able to play with this (relatively) old technology in a way it was never meant to be used. While this was a small experiment, I consider this application an interesting starting point for potentially creating many other interactive audio narratives and mobile games.
Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools

The NETLab Toolkit

June 4, 2012

The NETLab Toolkit is a system for integrating tangible interaction and media. Designed for project sketching and production, the toolkit enables novices and experts to integrate hardware, media and interactive behaviors for products, installations, and research.

This free collection of software makes it easy integrate all kinds of media with microcontrollers like the Arduino. Using a simple drag-and-drop interface, you can create interactive projects that combine sensors, video, text, graphics, sound, lighting, motors and more. These projects can be created quickly, without programming, using the smart widgets included with the Toolkit.


The NETLab Toolkit is a project of Philip van Allen and the New Ecology of Things Lab in the Media Design Program at Art Center College of Design. Ewan Branda is the developer of the NETLab Toolkit Hub.

HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Smart Objects, Tools

OnObject

April 10, 2012

OnObject is a small device user wears on hand to program physical objects to respond to gestural triggers. Attach an RFID tag to any objects, grab them by the tag, and program their responses to your grab, release, shake, swing, and thrust gestures using built in microphone or on-screen interface.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Tools

Dattoo

February 14, 2012

The concept of the Dattoo arose in response to current trends towards increasing connectivity and technology as self-expression. The body would literally become the interface. The idea of DNA tattoos (Dattoos) is to use the body itself as a hardware and interaction platform. To achieve absolute personal identification, the hardware would capture DNA from the user’s body, enabling direct participation in the political and cultural landscape.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Tools

Proximeter

January 24, 2012

The Proximeter is an ambient social navigation instrument that tracks the past and future proximity of one’s social cloud in an ambient display. By reading existing calendar and social network feeds, and abstracting these into a glanceable pattern of paths, it nurtures a social proprioception, creating more face-to-face interactions.

Ambient Intelligence, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Smart Objects, Tools

AirTiles

November 19, 2011

AirTiles is a novel modular device that allows users to create geometric shapes in the real world and add a flexible sensing space within the created shape. In this interactive audio/visual environment, users can freely manipulate and rotate the device and rotate it so that a geometrical shape appears on the floor.

Ambient Intelligence, Conferences, Design, HCI, Tools

Transform 2011

June 20, 2011

Mayo Clinic Transform 2011

The leading health conference where design matters.

Mayo Clinic — the world’s largest and first integrated nonprofit medical practice — is pleased to once again host our Transform symposium on September 11-13, 2011 in Rochester, Minn

This premier multidisciplinary event focuses on innovations and designing solutions to transform the experience and delivery of health care. We expect the audience of approximately 1,000 attendees from around the world to participate in person — thousands more will engage online. There will be ample opportunities for networking and collaborations, numerous surprises, and incredible talks from world renowned experts in their field.

The audience will be a dynamic mix of innovators, leadership and decision makers from health care organizations, information technology, Web 2.0, policy makers, designers, and entrepreneurs across many fields that touch health care; and thought-provoking spaces that are not — but perhaps should be — part of the conversation.

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Gestural interfaces: a step backwards in usability

June 10, 2011
Donald A. Norman and Jakob Nielsen of the Nielsen Norman group argue about the usability of today’s gestural user interfaces.

One step forward, two steps back.

The usability crisis is upon us, once again. We suspect most of you thought it was over. After all, HCI certainly understands how to make things usable, so the emphasis has shifted to more engaging topics, such as exciting new applications, new technological developments, and the challenges of social networks and ubiquitous connection and communication. Well you are wrong.

“In a recent column for Interactions Norman pointed out that the rush to develop gestural interfaces – “natural” they are sometimes called – well-tested and understood standards of interaction design were being overthrown, ignored, and violated.

Recently, Raluca Budui and Hoa Loranger from the Nielsen Norman group performed usability tests on Apple’s iPad, reaching much the same conclusion. The new applications for gestural control in smart cellphones (notably the iPhone and the Android) and the coming arrival of larger screen devices built upon gestural operating systems (starting with Apple’s iPad) promise even more opportunities for well-intended developers to screw things up. […]

There are several important fundamental principles of interaction design that are completely independent of technology:
· Visibility (also called perceived affordances or signifiers)
· Feedback
· Consistency (also known as standards)
· Non-destructive operations (hence the importance of undo)
· Discoverability: All operations can be discovered by systematic exploration of menus
· Scalability. The operation should work on all screen sizes, small and large.
· Reliability. Operations should work. Period. And events should not happen randomly.

All these are rapidly disappearing from the toolkit of designers, aided, we must emphasize, by the weird design guidelines issued by Apple, Google, and Microsoft.”

Read article

Internet of Things, Tools

Mapping the Internet of Things

June 2, 2011

Vista Data Vision – Real-Time Map

Vista Data Vision is an application to help you manage, visualise and analyse sensor data from real word objects. Using Vista Data Vision’s applications it is possible to store logged data from devices and display and publish it to the web.

Vista Data Vision also provide an interface that allows users to view the data from logged devices via a Google Map. The demonstration map from VDV features mapped devices from weather stations and environmental sites around the world.

Using the map it is possible to view real-time data from a number of field measurement devices at different locations. The map displays the latest measurements and graphs of the data.

Pachube

Pachube is a service that enables users to connect, tag and share real time sensor data from objects, devices, buildings and environments around the world. The key aim of the site is to facilitate interaction between remote environments, both physical and virtual.

The home page of Pachube features a large Google Map that displays live data feeds from a number of objects and devices around the world. The data feeds vary from weather stations, air quality sensors to domestic monitoring devices.

Tales of Things

The Tales of Things allows you to tag real world objects. After being tagged the objects can then be geo-located on Google Maps and be followed on Twitter.

A free iPhone app allows anyone with an iPhone to scan, comment and add locations to objects. The application lets you take a photo and add a QR code to any object, that can then be followed on the Tale of Things.

If you find an object with a Tale’s of Things QR code attached to it you can scan and decode the object on the Tale of Things website and learn more about its history and movements.

Tale of Things is a collaborative project from Brunel University, Edinburgh College of Art, University College London, University of Dundee and University of Salford.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools

Immaterials: light painting Wifi

June 1, 2011

“The complex technologies the networked city relies upon to produce its effects remain distressingly opaque, even to those exposed to them on a daily basis.” – Adam Greenfield (2009)

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/20412632]

Immaterials: light painting WiFi film by Timo Arnall, Jørn Knutsen and Einar Sneve Martinussen.

This project explores the invisible terrain of WiFi networks in urban spaces by light painting signal strength in long-exposure photographs. A four-metre tall measuring rod with 80 points of light reveals cross-sections through WiFi networks using a photographic technique called light-painting.

20 December, 16.57

This builds on a technique that was invented for the 2009 film ‘Immaterials: the Ghost in the Field’ which probed the edges of the invisible fields that surround RFID readers and tags in the world. It also began a series of investigations into what Matt Jones richly summarised as ‘Immaterials’.

While we were mapping out tiny RFID fields, we wondered what it would be like to apply the light painting process to larger-scale fields of Bluetooth, WiFi, GSM and 3G. What if we built huge light painting apparatus that could map out architectural and city-scale networks in the places and spaces they inhabited? We’re still very interested in understanding radio and wireless networks as one of the substrates essential to contemporary design practice.

20 December, 16.46

We built the WiFi measuring rod, a 4-metre tall probe containing 80 lights that respond to the Received Signal Strength (RSSI) of a particular WiFi network. When we walk through architectural, urban spaces with this probe, while taking long-exposure photographs, we visualise the cross-sections, or strata, of WiFi signal strength, situated within photographic urban scenes. The cross-sections are an abstraction of WiFi signal strength, a line graph of RSSI across physical space. Although it can be used to determine actual signal strength at a given point, it is much more interesting as a way of seeing the overall pattern, the relative peaks and the troughs situated in the surrounding physical space.

20 December, 15.54

After a week of walking through urban spaces holding and photographing this instrument, we have a much better sense of the qualities of WiFi in urban spaces, its random crackles, bright and dim spots, its reaction to the massing of buildings, and its broad reach through open areas. The resulting images show some of these qualities, and light painting is a brilliant medium for situating visualisations and data into physical world locations and situations.

Lots more visualisations and ‘making of’ pictures.

Einar writes more about this in an upcoming article called ‘Making material of the Networked City’ in Design Innovation for the Built Environment – Research by Design and the Renovation of Practice. There is also more detail on the project at the YOUrban weblog.

Via: TOUCH

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

ReadWriteWeb (RWW)

ReadWriteWeb (RWW) is a Web technology blog launched in 2003. RWW is one of the world’s top blogs covering Web 2.0 and Web technology in general, and provides industry news, reviews, and analysis. Founded by Richard MacManus,[1] Technorati currently ranks ReadWriteWeb within the top 20 blogs worldwide.[2] RWW is also in the top ten of the Techmeme leaderboards.[3] MacManus is based in Lower Hutt, New Zealand,[4] but the officers and writers of RWW work from diverse locations, including Silicon Valley and Portland, Oregon. In September or October 2008, the New York Times technology section began syndicating RWW content online.[5][6]

Ambient Intelligence, Internet of Things, people, Smart Objects, Tools

Arduino

ReadWriteWeb featured Arduino as one offive companies building the Internet of Things. Arduino is akin to the transistor radio kit your grandparents used to buy when they were kids. These more-modern versions are open-source electronic protoyping platforms, and they are the preferred gadgets of Internet of Things tinkerers. Last summer we told you about how devices like Arduino and Pachube can be combined with the Web to control the lighting in your home.
You can access the blog feed here.

There are a half-dozen other prominent Internet of Things blogs that didn’t make this list. If you know of one that has been left out please make sure to post a link to their feed in the comments below.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, Media Art, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Tools

Touch

Touch is an interdisciplinary team that studies Near Field Communication between mobile devices and things. With an emphasis on RFID, the blog focuses on “social and cultural inquiry, interaction/industrial design, rapid prototyping, software, testing and exhibitions.” Touch has extensive reference material; it’s a good repository of NFC-oriented information. You can access the blog feed here.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Zach Shelby On The Internet of Things

Zach Shelby is co-founder and head of research at Sensinode in Finland. His vision is that the physcial Internet – the Internet of Things – is the next big frontier in telecommunications. Shelby’s focus is on “driving 6LoWPAN related standardization, research and commercialization.” He’s also written a book called 6LoWPAN: The Wireless Embedded Internet, which “is aimed at experts in the field, engineering students and lecturers.” The book is accompanied by a website of course material, including Contiki coding exercises. You can access his blog feed here.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Internet of Things, Smart Objects, Tools

Dash7

Dash7 focuses on the development of low-power, long-range wireless sensor networking. In early April of this year we explained how DASH7 may soon be on your mobile phone. This technology “plays at the intersection of location-based services, Internet of Things, social networking, and other mobile services.” You can access the blog feed here.

Design, Internet of Things, people, Persuasive Technologies, Tools

Project M

May 14, 2011

Article via Frog

Mobile phones are changing everything in emerging markets, as people overcome roadblocks to communication and information. Previously isolated communities are getting a taste of access and upward mobility they’ve never known before, causing economies to shift. frog and its partners believe mobile phones can transform healthcare, too. Frog created Project M, an HIV/AIDS support and awareness network driven by text communication.

“The world’s largest field trial in mobile health technology.”
– The Economist

 

Video

 

It Starts With Research in the Field

In a partnership between frog, Aricent Group, PopTech, iTeach, Praekelt, Nokia Siemens and others, Project M (short for Project Masiluleke, which means “lend a helping hand” in Zulu) is using mobile technology to tackle the worst HIV epidemic in the world in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, where infection rates are more than 40 percent. This is not the first attempt to address the HIV problems there, but after sending a team to South Africa to do extensive research on the ground with local experts, we believe the system we’ve created is the most effective solution to date.

Almost 90 percent of people in South Africa own a mobile phone, allowing Project M to use mobile technology in three crucial ways: to encourage use of low-cost diagnostic test kits (which frog created; see video, below); to walk patients through the at-home testing process; and to guide people into care should they need it and encourage healthy preventative behaviors if they don’t.

1 Million Texts Per Day

Project M launched its first phase in 2009 when a text message was sent to 1 million phones to encourage people to be tested and treated for HIV/AIDS. The Economist called it “the world’s largest field trial in mobile health technology.” This campaign helped triple the average daily call volume to the National AIDS Helpline, encouraging more than 150,000 people to reach out for information.

Since the initial launch, we’ve done more extensive user testing and added treatment and compliance reminders in the form of an SMS-based alert system for HIV and TB patients. Our long-term goal is to show how mobile technology can positively influence healthcare issues in Africa, so we can build a series of alliances around the world that bring together mobile operators and distributed diagnostics.

The Future of Digital Healthcare

We see a future in which local healthcare providers, NGOs, and government agencies can log onto a website and configure a cost-effective diagnostic solution tailored and scaled to their needs. They will be able to increase access to diagnostic tools and regimens in some of the world’s most under-served regions.

“With hundreds of thousands of people suffering and dying, it’s no longer a question of ‘should we do this?’ or even ‘how should we do this?’ It’s ‘how fast can we do this?’”
– Dr Krista Dong, Director, iTeach

Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Media Art, Smart Objects, Tools

Squeeze Me

April 25, 2011

Squeeze Me is a squishy, battery powered, water-proof toy that detects certain bio-readings and responds to change with visual feedback using light patterns. The user can choose to be guided through various stress relieving breathing and relaxation exercises that use animated light sequences.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, Media Art, playstudies, Tools

WeatherField

March 7, 2011

WeatherField is a shape-shifting energy generation park in Abu Dhabi. The park is organized and designed to respond efficiently and creatively to climate. Energy generation becomes a public performance, dynamic, reactive, and interactive. The park is active when weather events are active, and calm when weather is calm, in each instance offering the public a compatible experiences.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Tools

Socio-Digital Systems Group

The Socio-Digital Systems (SDS) group of Microsoft Research aims to use an understanding of human values to help to change the technological landscape in the 21st century.

“Beyond making us all more productive and efficient, we ask how we can build technology to help us be more expressive, creative, and reflective in our daily lives.

Our group considers a broad range of human values, aims to understand their complexity, and puts them front and centre in technology development. An important aspect of this endeavour is the construction of new technologies that, in turn, we ourselves can shape. In so doing, we may create new ways that help us to actively realise our aspirations and desires, to engage with or disconnect from the world around us, to remember our past or to forget it, to connect with others or disengage from them. Important here are technologies which ultimately make our lives richer, and which offer us choice and flexibility in the things that we do.

SDS does this through the bringing together of social science, design and computer science. We believe that by understanding human values, we open up a space of new technological possibilities that stretches the boundaries of current conceptions of human-computer interaction.”

Infos on their projects and publications can be found online.

Ambient Intelligence, Design, HCI, Smart Objects, Tools

Good Night Lamp

February 15, 2011

The Good Night Lamp project is a family of lamps which allow people to communicate the act of coming back home to their loved ones, remotely. As you turn the bigger light on, your presence home is indicated to your friends whose smaller lamps turn on as well. Inversely, the smaller lamps that you’ve collected from your friends will turn on/off as they come home, go out, go to bed. You’ll never come back to an empty home again.

Design, HCI, Smart Objects, Tools

Kinematics

February 5, 2011

This paper describes Kinematics [PDF]: a novel construction toy for children consisting of both active (shape-changing or rotating) and passive building blocks. In comparison to similar systems, the active components of Kinematics do not require programming or recording. This allows children to focus on reassembly and direct observation of the resulting movement from simple changes made to a constructed structure.