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Transmedia Storytelling – ..
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Category: Transmedia Storytelling

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, HCI, playstudies, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

Magic Leap

October 26, 2015

3037345-inline-i-1-the-magic-leap-story

Magic Leap, Inc., a developer of novel human computing interfaces and software, announced in a newsletter the recent closing of its A round of venture capital. Magic Leap has now raised more than $50 million in its series seed and A rounds to develop its proprietary technology platform. Magic Leap will use the funds to advance the product development and commercialization of its proprietary human computing interface technology, known as “Cinematic RealityTM”.

At engagdet – Mariella Moon states that she can’t decipher what Magic Leap exactly is – but she argues that Magic Leap is:

a headset that superimposes digital images onto the real world. In that respect, it’s similar to Microsoft’s HoloLens, which is just slightly less mysterious (since we’ve actually seen it). But based on the things Abovitz said in his AMA at reddit, like “Our vision for AR and VR is a true replication of visual reality,” there’s a chance that it can also block the outside world entirely with virtual reality. (Update: Rachel Metz confirmed to engagdet on Twitter that it’s capable of doing full VR.)


This points out  that there’s a reason why the company is calling its technology “cinematic reality” rather than AR or VR: it works a bit differently than either of them. Standard AR and VR use stereoscopic 3D, a technique that tricks you into thinking an object is three-dimensional by showing each eye a different image and a different angle of the same object. The Oculus Rift and Samsung’s Gear VR headset are two well-known examples of this technique.

magic-leap

In his AMA Abovitz revealed that he’s not a fan of stereoscopic 3D and believes it can cause “temporary and/or permanent neurologic deficits.” So, Magic Leap uses a Lilliputian projector to shine light and images into the user’s eyes instead, the startup told Metz from MIT’s Technology Review. Your brain apparently won’t be able to detect the difference between light from the projector and light from the real world: The result is life-like digital images that show reflections like real physical objects would.

Sources:

Magic Leap

reddit

engagdet

Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Psychocinematics: Exploring Cognition at the Movies

August 7, 2014

perception cinema

Largely through trial and error, filmmakers have developed engaging techniques that capture our sensations, thoughts, and feelings. Philosophers and film theorists have thought deeply about the nature and impact of these techniques, yet few scientists have delved into empirical analyses of our movie experience-or what Arthur P. Shimamura has coined “psychocinematics.”

This edited volume introduces this exciting field by bringing together film theorists, philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists to consider the viability of a scientific approach to our movie experience.

Ambient Intelligence, Design for Behavior, HCI, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Augmented Reality: Engagement Beyond Usability

July 18, 2014

Augmented reality describes the process of using technology to overlay virtual information onto the real world to ‘augment,’ or add value, to our experience. Augmented reality applications are unique in that because they project virtual information into a user’s physical environment, they effectively blend real and virtual. They are also increasingly mobile and social. These features amplify the level of impact and persuasive power of the user experience — when done right.

All kinds of things go into success. And you might argue that usability is the key. But at the highest level, success depends on more than usability; it depends upon user experience. User experience is more than all those things combined. Of course, you still need to follow best practices for good usability because if people can’t do something they can’t be persuaded by it. But usability is no longer a key differentiator. It’s not enough.

Pamela Rutledge, Media Psychologist, Social Media and Transmedia Storytelling Strategist at the Media Psychology Research Center, gave the following presentation on these topics recently at WorldComp12 EEE.

Presentation overview:
1. Defining engagement
2. The need for a holistic evaluation of user and customer experience to achieve engagement.
3.  The role of the of the brain in achieving psychological engagement and outline the 3-brain model that you can use as a rule of thumb in your design and marketing decisions
4. Mapping brain behavior on to two theories of optimal engagement: Flow and Narrative Transportation.   Flow is optimal engagement for task-based activities.  Using story or narrative is an equally powerful way to achieve optimal engagement in narrative-based products and properties where the goal is experiential rather than task-based.
7. The similarities and differences between Flow and Narrative immersion as goals are critical to designing, developing and evaluating mobile and immersive technologies like AR.
8. Introduces the Positive Engagement Evaluation model

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Virtual World Design

July 15, 2014

virtual-world-design

Written by an award-winning designer with 20 years of experience designing virtual environments for television and online communities, Virtual World Design explores the intertwining disciplines of 2D graphics, 3D models, lighting, sound, and storytelling. It illustrates how these disciplines come together by design in the creation of an accessible virtual environment for teaching, research, and entertainment. The book gives anyone the tools and techniques to design virtual environments that support their message and are accessible by all.

With 200 illustrations and 12 step-by-step projects, the book delivers hours of creative challenges for people working in public virtual worlds or on private grids. Using the modular components available for download on the author’s website, readers learn by building such things as a virtual classroom, an “all-access” terrain, and a sound-based game.

This book can be the foundation for class work in distance learning, simulation, and other learning technologies that use virtual environments. It shows both novices and advanced users how 3D composition, color, lighting, and sound design are used in the creation of an immersive virtual environment.

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Transmedia Storytelling

A Game Design Vocabulary

March 12, 2014

game vocabulary

Why aren’t videogames getting better? Why does it feel like we’re playing the same games, over and over again? Why aren’t games helping us transform our lives, like great music, books, and movies do?

The problem is language. We still don’t know how to talk about game design. We can’t share our visions. We forget what works (and doesn’t). We don’t learn from history. It’s too hard to improve.

The breakthrough starts here. A Game Design Vocabulary gives us the complete game design framework we desperately need—whether we create games, study them, review them, or build businesses on them.

Craft amazing experiences. Anna Anthropy and Naomi Clark share foundational principles, examples, and exercises that help you create great player experiences…complement intuition with design discipline…and craft games that succeed brilliantly on every level.

  • Liberate yourself from stale clichés and genres
  • Tell great stories: go way beyond cutscenes and text dumps
  • Control the crucial relationships between game “verbs” and “objects”
  • Wield the full power of development, conflict, climax, and resolution
  • Shape scenes, pacing, and player choices
  • Deepen context via art, animation, music, and sound
  • Help players discover, understand, engage, and “talk back” to you
  • Effectively use resistance and difficulty: the “push and pull” of games
  • Design holistically: integrate visuals, audio, and controls
  • Communicate a design vision everyone can understand
Books, Design, Design for Behavior, Persuasive Technologies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Behavioral Economics: A History

February 17, 2014

behavioural economics

This book presents a history of behavioral economics. The recurring theme is that behavioral economics reflects and contributes to a fundamental reorientation of the epistemological foundations upon which economics had been based since the days of Smith, Ricardo, and Mill. With behavioral economics, the discipline has shifted from grounding its theories in generalized characterizations to building theories from behavioral assumptions directly amenable to empirical validation and refutation. The book proceeds chronologically and takes the reader from von Neumann and Morgenstern’s axioms of rational behavior, through the incorporation of rational decision theory in psychology in the 1950s-1970s, and to the creation and rise of behavioral economics in the 1980s and 1990s at the Sloan and Russell Sage Foundations.

Augmented Reality, Conferences, Design, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

The Leviathan Project

January 10, 2014

On January 6th 2012, at the Intel Pre-Conference Keynote at CES in Las Vegas – for the first time in public – Intel and USC World Building Media Lab unveiled the Leviathan – a giant Whale that swims above an audience of 5000, all reaching out to touch the creature flying overhead.

From the presentation:

We bring you an experiment in storytelling that shatters the membrane between audience and content. The Leviathan Project creates an immersive world in which audiences can engage, explore and physically experience virtual environments and fantastic characters.

We are playtesting a future where the design of a world precedes the telling of a story, and the richly detailed world becomes a container for countless narratives.

What Is 5D?

5D Institute is a cutting edge USC non-profit Organized Research Unit dedicated to the dissemination, education, and appreciation of the future of narrative media through World Building.

World Building designates a narrative practice in which the design of a world precedes the telling of a story; the richly detailed world becomes a container for narrative, producing stories that emerge logically and organically from its well-designed core.

World Building is founded on three beliefs, namely that storytelling is the most powerful system for the advancement of human capability due to its ability to allow the human imagination to precede the realization of thought; that all stories emerge logically and intuitively from the worlds that create them; and that new technologies powerfully enable us to sculpt the imagination into existence.

5D Institute is the world’s leading World Building collective. Our network of preeminent World Builders transcends borders and boundaries in film, animation, fashion, gaming, theatre, television, music, architecture, science, interactive media and more.

Through the newly cemented partnership with USC School of Cinematic Arts, 5D Institute is evolving into an unmatched connector between the next generation of young and undiscovered creators traversing the bleeding edge of innovation and companies who want to be at the frontlines of the new media landscape.

Since Oct 2008, we have come together at 5D’s distributed events to engage in a disruptive interrogation of our fractured disciplines, to create best practices and a new shared language across narrative media.

‘The neural sparking between left brain and right brain is at the core of 5D – we are moving into a landscape where art and science, design and engineering are inseparable. At their intersection lies the new creative laboratory for the future of our narrative practices.’

– Alex McDowell, 5D Institute Director

For more information:  5dinstitute.org/

Ambient Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Books, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

The Art of Immersion

September 4, 2013

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The Art of Immersion – a highly praised book – author Frank Rose explains his understanding of storytelling, and what it means for us all:

Some quotes from the webpage:

 What we’re witnessing is the emergence of a new form of narrative that’s native to the In­ternet. Told through many media at once in a nonlinear fashion, these new narratives en­cour­age us not merely to watch but to par­ticipate, often engaging us in the same way that games do. This is “deep media”: stories that are not just entertaining but immersive, that take you deep­er than an hour-long TV drama or a two-hour movie or a 30-second spot will permit.

From this point forward, storytellers of every persuasion will need to function in a world in which distinctions that were clear throughout the industrial age are be­coming in­creasingly blurred:

  • The blurring of author and audience: Whose story is it?
  • The blurring of story and game: How do you engage with it?
  • The blurring of entertainment and marketing: What function does it serve?
  • The blurring of fiction and reality: Where does one end and the other begin?

In THE ART OF IMMERSIONWired correspondent Frank Rose describes why this is happening to us.

“Highly readable, deeply engaging . . . accessible and urgent.”

—Henry Jenkins, author of Convergence Culture

The Art of Immersion is a must read for all filmmakers.”

—Ted Hope, producer of 21 Grams and The Laramie Project

 

More reviews:


“The Web lets us dive deeper than ever before, though into what is up to us. A new avant-garde is taking the plunge – not underground, but online. For those of us lagging behind, wading rather than diving into art’s new cyber-sphere, Frank Rose makes an excellent guide.” The Atlantic

 

★ “Like Marshall McLuhan’s groundbreaking 1964 book, Understanding Media, this engrossing study of how new media is reshaping the entertainment, advertising, and communication industries is an essential read.” —Library Journal

 

“Fascinating . . . [Frank Rose] talks about how the Internet is changing the way we create and consume narrative. He notes that media innovations, such as radio or television, take a few decades before we learn how to best utilize them. TV started out as live broadcasts and ended up creating a new form of narrative. The Internet started out as a digital repository for print journalism, but is now creating a new form of engagement. ‘We are ceasing to be consumers of mass media,’ says Rose, ‘we are becoming participants in social media—a far more fluid environment in which we simultaneously act as producers, consumers, curators, and commentators, sharing our thoughts and perceptions with people we know and people we don’t.'”
—Arianna Huffington, The Huffington Post

 

“The worldwide web has already begun to have an influence on imaginative ex­pres­sion. The Internet, as Frank Rose writes in The Art of Immersion, ‘is the first me­dium that can act like all media. It can be text, or audio, or video, or all of the above. . . .’ According to Rose, ‘a new type of narrative is emerging – one that’s told through many media at once in a way that’s nonlinear, that’s participatory and often game-like, and that’s designed above all to be immersive. This is deep media.'”
Robert McCrum, The Observer

 

“Compelling . . . The era of the couch potato, argues Rose, is at an end. . . . From Star Wars to Lost (‘television for the hive mind’), it is the immersive, ‘fractal-like com­plexity’ of storytelling that turns on digital audiences and sends them online to extend the fantasy via wikis, Twitter and blogs.” —P.D. Smith, The Guardian

 

“It’s a grand trip, taking in everything from Charles Dickens to Super Mario and Avatar. The book is meticulously researched, persuasively constructed and benefits from an impressive level of access.” New Scientist

 

 

“Tremendously lively and clever . . . An intelligent guide to how technologies have created new opportunities for narrative.” —Scotland on Sunday

 

“Clear, concise and scrupulously fact-checked . . . For anyone even remotely in­terested in a how-we-got-here-and-where-we’re-going guide to interactive, socially-networked entertainment, it’s an essential read.” —David Hughes, Empire

 

“As the American Frank Rose argues in his book The Art of Immersion, TV pro­grammes such as the internationally successful drama Lost have spread out from their original shape, partly . . . because scriptwriters have become influenced by games culture.” —BBC World Service

 

“An exciting book which shows how the Internet is changing the world of entertainment. . . . Frank Rose describes an ongoing artistic revolution that breaks with traditional, linear narrative and gives us a new understanding of reality.”
TF1 News

 

“An inquiry into the heart of the culture industry. . . . [The Art of Immersion] reflects on the unstable borders of fiction—before and after the digital revolution—and even on the definition of a work of art.” —Les Inrockuptibles

 


“With this book, Rose seeks to convey the message that we are only at the beginning of a radical anthropological shift. The revolution brought about by the Internet is altering reality, and this transformed world is inventing its own language and its own codes to portray itself.” —Libération

 

“A new media bible.” la Repubblica

 

“Television has not disappeared, nor will it. But content production is changing pro­foundly. The networked computer has facilitated the rise of deep media, that is, me­dia which take into account the exhaustion of the unidirectional broadcast model of television, pointing directly to the involvement of the audience as generators of con­tent. It is to these deep media that the book is dedicated.”
Benedetto Vecchi, il Manifesto

 

“A comprehensive overview of the evolution of the way we create culture and enter­tainment.” —la Stampa

 

“Captivating . . . We’re in the midst of a fascinating – and delirious, often over­whelming – cultural moment, one that Rose, with his important new book, astutely helps us to understand.” —Holly Willis, KCET-TV Los Angeles

 

"

“An essential overview . . . Applications in the academic world are clear (it is already on the syllabi for classes at USC and Columbia), but it also constitutes a prerequisite for those wishing to enter Hollywood, and marketers or PR professionals wishing to engage an increasingly fragmented audience.”
International Journal of Advertising

 

“In his terrific new book, The Art of Immersion, [Frank Rose] captures the need for new thinking. . . . We need tools to tell new stories for new times, and our stories right now reflect our culture: they’re fragmented, dispersed, remixed and remade. They’re networked and participatory and nonlinear.” —Filmmaker

Books, Design, Design for Behavior, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Designing Games: A Guide to Engineering Experiences

August 14, 2013

.designing games

How do video games resonate with players to become worldwide hits? This practical book shows you how the right combination of story elements, psychology, and game theory can generate emotionally charged experiences that take players beyond mindless entertainment. Author and experienced game designer Tynan Sylvester takes you through everything from narrative to motivation, using down-to-earth advice and real-world examples. Great games affect people in ways that stories alone cannot, and there are lots of possibilities yet to discover.

This book is a light along that path. Learn how to make practical design decisions and weigh trade offs Establish a planning horizon and test your design through iteration Find low-cost, high-reward solutions for making your game accessible yet deep Understand methods for balancing levels, scheduling rewards, and designing rich multilayer interactions Provide motivation, and discover how to make the game just difficult enough

Ambient Intelligence, Books, Internet of Things, Persuasive Technologies, playstudies, Smart Objects, Tools, Transmedia Storytelling

Augmented Reality: An Emerging Technologies Guide to AR

November 14, 2012

Unknown

With the explosive growth in mobile phone usage and rapid rise in search engine technologies over the last decade, augmented reality (AR) is poised to be one of this decade’s most disruptive technologies, as the information that is constantly flowing around us is brought into view, in real-time, through augmented reality. In this cutting-edge book, the authors outline and discuss never-before-published information about augmented reality and its capabilities. With coverage of mobile, desktop, developers, security, challenges, and gaming, this book gives you a comprehensive understanding of what augmented reality is, what it can do, what is in store for the future and most importantly: how to benefit from using AR in our lives and careers.

  • Educates readers how best to use augmented reality regarless of industry
  • Provides an in-depth understanding of AR and ideas ranging from new business applications to new crime fighting methods
  • Includes actual examples and case studies from both private and government applications
Ambient Intelligence, Books, Design, Design for Behavior, HCI, Persuasive Technologies, Smart Objects, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing

October 25, 2012

brainfluence

Brainfluence explains how to practically apply neuroscience and behavior research to better market to consumers by understanding their decision patterns. This application, called neuromarketing, studies the way the brain responds to various cognitive and sensory marketing stimuli. Analysts use this to measure a consumer’s preference, what a customer reacts to, and why consumers make certain decisions. Roger Dooley is the creator and publisher of Neuromarketing, the most popular blog on using brain and behavior research in marketing, advertising, and sales.

Books, Design, HCI, playstudies, Transmedia Storytelling

Storytelling for User Experience: Crafting Stories for Better Design

June 10, 2012

storytelling user experience

Authors: Whitney Quesenbery, Kevin Brooks

We all use stories to communicate, explore, persuade, and inspire. In user experience, stories help us to understand our users, learn about their goals, explain our research, and demonstrate our design ideas. In this book, Quesenbery and Brooks teach you how to craft and tell your own unique stories to improve your designs.
Testimonials:
“Stories facilitate a level of communication that is as close to telepathy as you can get. Kevin and Whitney guide you to use storytelling in `how to’ scenarios so smoothly that you may never realize how far you leapfrogged ahead and never know the mistakes you didn’t make because of this book. It’s that good.”
—Annette Simmons, author of The Story Factor
“A very practical, readable survey of ways to use
Books, playstudies, Theory, Transmedia Storytelling

The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human

April 20, 2012

storytelling animal

Humans live in landscapes of make-believe: we spin fantasies, we devour novels, films, and plays and even our sporting events and criminal trials unfold as narratives. Yet the world of story has long remained an undiscovered and unmapped country. It’s easy to say that humans are “wired” for story, but “why”?

In this delightful and original book, Jonathan Gottschall offers the first unified theory of storytelling. He argues that stories are a way of rehearsing life’s complex social problems: Our penchant for story has evolved, like other behaviors, to enhance our survival, and, crucially, that of our social group. Gottschall explores the deep pattern in children’s make-believe, and what that reveals about story’s prehistoric origins. We are master shapers of story. “The Storytelling Animal “finally reveals how stories shape “us.”